Summer Savings! Get unlimited digital access for 13 weeks for $13.

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Too much ado over breast-feeding

When did breast-feeding become everyone's business ("Maryland urges hospitals to encourage early breast-feeding," Nov. 14)?

I am shocked at how many complete strangers ask new mothers if they are breast-feeding. Now the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is encouraging hospitals not to give pacifiers or formula to new mothers.

Yes, studies have shown that "breast is best." Yes, it is a powerful bonding experience between a mother and child.

But if a new mom medically can't nurse her newborn, she is left feeling like a failure. And, heaven forbid, if a mother chooses not to breast-feed, she is made to feel guilty by society.

As a mother of two, my first-born was too premature to nurse, but my second son breast-fed easily — and he has asthma. Go figure.

Let's leave this decision between a new mom and her infant, where it belongs.

Rose Kendig, Reisterstown

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Maryland releases breast-feeding recommendations for hospitals

    Maryland releases breast-feeding recommendations for hospitals

    Maryland health officials want the state's hospitals to play a larger role in encouraging mothers to breast-feed in the crucial hours after they give birth, as growing evidence points to the health benefits of feeding babies human milk.

  • Iran deal threatens Israel

    Iran deal threatens Israel

    It is sad to see The Baltimore Sun's editorial board acknowledge its support for this awful deal with Iran ("A 'good enough' deal," July 27). War will not be the result if the deal is not signed, but at least the sanctions would still be in place. The only countries benefiting from this deal will...

  • Medicare deserves support

    Medicare deserves support

    Last Wednesday, Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush said that we ought to phase out Medicare and that the nation needs to "move to a new system that allows them to have something, because they're not going to have anything." Mr. Bush also praised Rep. Paul Ryan, the architect of a long-term...

  • Eyedrops a flawed substitute for cataract surgery

    Eyedrops a flawed substitute for cataract surgery

    Every medical therapy must weigh both risks and benefits ("Genetics study points towards eyedrop cataract treatment," July 22). While eye drop therapy to treat cataracts sounds enticing, I am not sure its use is worth the potential development costs and risks.

  • Another mass shooting, and who's responsible?

    Another mass shooting, and who's responsible?

    I am a cinema buff, and I went to the Charles Theatre recently to see a wonderful film. While there I realized that another mentally ill person decided to vent his furies in a movie theater. This time in Lafayette, La. ("La. shooter a drifter with 'hate in his heart,'" July 25). This is the USA,...

  • Iran deal opponents seek war

    Iran deal opponents seek war

    The editorial, "A 'good enough' agreement" (July 24), correctly supports the nuclear deal between the West and Iran which will help to bring peace and stability to the Middle East, will bring both economic and political benefits to the U.S., and is supported by 60 percent of the American people....

  • Deinstitutionalization and the homeless

    Deinstitutionalization and the homeless

    Public-interest attorney Michael Millemann spearheaded a project in 1981 that removed 300 mentally disabled adults from institutions for the psychiatrically ill and found them appropriate placements.

  • Helping poor is what Jesus expects

    Helping poor is what Jesus expects

    I'm always grateful for the careful research and insights of Dan Rodricks' columns and for their consistent compassion.

Comments
Loading

90°