Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Reimer wrong on birth control flap

In response to Susan Reimer's column ("Women will remember in November," March 12), it is amazing to me that she, and others cannot see through the fog that is being intentionally created by President Barack Obama and the Democrats.

No one on the right is calling for additional restrictions on birth control or contraceptive access. The debate has nothing to do with birth control and women's rights. It is, however, about something more important, and that is the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution which all politicians have taken an oath to uphold and support. President Obama has, under recently-adopted regulations stemming from his health care reform law, dictated that Catholic and other religious institutions and employers (and their insurance providers) must provide certain free birth control and contraceptive means and services, which are contrary to their basic religious tenets and beliefs. That is a violation of the First Amendment. I am not Catholic, but an assault on their First Amendment liberties should concern us all.

To couch the issues and debate as an assault on birth control, as Ms. Reimer does, is not only wrong, but it serves to further the Obama administration's real purpose, which is to call attention to social, class, and sexual issues and away from what is really important and vital in the coming election — that is Mr. Obama's dismal record on the economy, jobs, taxes, debt and unemployment.

Paul F. Robinson, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • School birth control makes parents' jobs harder

    School birth control makes parents' jobs harder

    It is the parents' job to teach their children right from wrong. At the very least, schools should not be making the parents' job harder ("Amid teen pregnancy decline, debate renewed about birth control in schools," June 6).

  • Teens have a right to birth control

    Teens have a right to birth control

    As two organizations committed to increasing access to reproductive health care services for all Marylanders, we were glad to see The Sun highlight the availability of contraceptives in school-based health clinics ("Amid teen pregnancy decline, debate renewed about birth control in schools," June...

  • Another furor over contraceptives

    Another furor over contraceptives

    By law, public school students in Maryland do not need their parents' permission to receive reproductive health services from school-based clinics. Nor are the schools under any obligation to inform parents when their children access such services or what kind of services they are given. This has...

  • On birth control, young Republicans get it

    On birth control, young Republicans get it

    Two-thirds of young Republicans believe that every woman should have access to affordable birth control, 65 percent believe that insurance companies should cover contraception without co-pays and 51 percent believe that the federal government should continue to fund contraceptive services for low-income...

  • Pills don't prevent STDs

    Pills don't prevent STDs

    This letter is in response to Susan Reimer's column about the GOP's attitude about birth control ("On birth control, young Republicans get it," April 15). I think Ms. Reimer's opinion is very narrow-minded. While I agree that young people often have premarital sex with no desire to procreate, I...

  • Stokes, like many before him, is wrong on birth control

    Stokes, like many before him, is wrong on birth control

    Readers Diana Philip and Spencer Hall were right to call out City Councilman Carl Stokes for his characterization of teen access to contraceptives as "a racist policy targeting African-American youth" ("Teens have a right to birth control," June 11).

Comments
Loading

75°