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News Opinion Readers Respond

Lay down your arms, Baltimore [Letter]

Police Commissioner Anthony Batts may have the single toughest job in the United States. Each small victory for the police department is trumped by more outrageous acts of ugly violence. A city weeps and prays for the family of a slain three year old ("Family and friends mourn 3-year-old Baltimore girl killed by gunfire," Aug. 8). Incredible, it is life (and death) as we know it in Baltimore. It seems as if we have become inured to the astonishing numbers of lives lost.

Once again, our city has become a cesspool of murder, recklessness and a lack of mores or values that are instilled in most of us. The especially pathetic thing is that city residents are being defined by the few cowards who choose to make our streets so frighteningly dangerous.

To the cowards, wanna-be gang members, and whoever else chooses to pack a deadly firearm with intent to inflict harm, put down your weapons and face life like the rest of us, without the "game changer" you occasionally display and carelessly wield. Life is not easy, but perhaps it was meant to be that way.

In the name of sanity, lay down your firearms. A city's future is in the balance.

Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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