Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Viewed from train or bus, the city doesn't put its best foot forward

Recently I boarded an Amtrak train headed for New York City. But as we embarked on our journey I was struck by the trash and debris strewn along the route. The dilapidated houses, abandoned buildings, discarded furniture and graffiti were more than I could bear.

I wondered what passengers from elsewhere must think of Baltimore as they ride this route. If I were them, I wouldn't see this as a place to live or raise a family, only a place with a lot of crime and poverty. If travelers never got off the train to visit the Inner Harbor or see the cleaner sections of the city they might think that this is all there was.

Not only is the train route atrocious, the route the Bolt bus takes leaving the city is just as repulsive. The bus travels east along North Avenue, and passengers sometimes gasp at the abandoned vacant houses, trash and general unpleasantness.

Such first impressions of Baltimore are lasting. Why wouldn't we want visitors and travelers to have a better introduction to our city?

If Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley were to see firsthand what I saw, perhaps they might be motivated to make the changes necessary to present Baltimore in a better light.

Sharon D. Frierson

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • A new bus service to replace the Red Line?

    A new bus service to replace the Red Line?

    If city leaders want to see the Red Line built they really don't have to look too far to find the answer ("City leaders remain dedicated to fighting for Red Line," July 1).

  • Red Line benefits ignored

    Red Line benefits ignored

    Gov. Larry Hogan's decision to cancel the Red Line light rail project after over 10 years of hard work and $288 million in tax dollars spent was a shocker for sure ("Hogan goes off the tracks," June 25). We have to ask exactly what kind of analysis did he do?

  • Treat Lee and Jackson as veterans

    Treat Lee and Jackson as veterans

    Confederate soldiers are legal veterans under U.S. law, and shouldn't this apply to the statue of Confederate veterans Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson ("Status of Confederate statues to be reviewed in Baltimore," June 30)?

  • Baltimore can pay for its own light rail

    Baltimore can pay for its own light rail

    Since most citizens of Maryland, especially those who do not live in Baltimore, would have to supply the $3 billion for the Red Line, I understand why Gov. Larry Hogan has turned it down ("City leaders remain dedicated to fighting for Red Line," July 1).

  • Beware the allure of the evil tempter

    Beware the allure of the evil tempter

    We need our young people to wake up and realize they are being used as pawns in a high-stakes game. They do the selling, the killing, the robbing and stealing while the tempter sits and enjoys his freedom. The tempter spends no time in jail and gets to dictate who lives and who dies. And our youth...

  • Don't tear down Confederate statues

    Don't tear down Confederate statues

    Has the world gone completely nuts? The Confederate battle flag has been used as a blatantly racist taunt for several generations by large numbers of ignorant hateful people. The Confederate statues around Maryland are a significant part of our history and should be a reminder to new generations...

Comments
Loading

84°