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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Police must win the trust of city residents

The chasm between the Baltimore City Police Department and city residents seems to be widening ("Batts shakes up police top ranks," July 10).

The only way out is simple: The police need to increase their communication with those whom they serve. For the citizens, it's all about opening up and cooperating with the police. Snitching is highly encouraged if is to the betterment of the community.

Blood is flowing in our streets this summer. But police cannot do their jobs if witnesses do not come forward. The stop snitching mantra needs to be mothballed. It has become a ball and chain for some neighborhoods.

Lou Reed once sang that "you need a busload of faith to get by." I agree — along with communication (from police) and cooperation (from citizens).

I pray we get this right before too long. Time is tight, and so are the nerves of many inhabitants of our city.

Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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