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News Opinion Readers Respond

Why I love Baltimore — but live in the burbs

I am not a resident of Baltimore, but I was born there and lived my first two years there. I have since been a Baltimore County resident, now deeply ensconced in middle-age suburban living.

And, yes, I'll be the first to say I love the city. What I cannot tolerate is some city residents who seemingly just do not care.

Indifference creates ignorance, and that can literally bring a city to its knees. Pathetic but true. So Baltimore sits on a precipice where no one knows what's around the next bend. And it's a bit frightening.

It's OK to care about your city, to be a proud resident of Baltimore. And it's also OK to voice your opinion or get involved in other ways in your neighborhood. Just show that you care.

I suppose I just wish more residents of Baltimore were seriously and fervently concerned about the future of our city.

Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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