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Readers Respond

News Opinion Readers Respond

Good riddance to the bag tax [Letter]

The city's proposed 10-cent bag tax was unwarranted and burdensome to the citizens of Baltimore ("City Council votes down 10-cent bag fee," Jan 27).

I along with most of my neighbors in Belair-Edison reuse or recycle our plastic and paper bags. The disposable bags are a hygienic necessity for those with small children, invalids or pets. We also use them to store and carry items. (For example, most of the food donated by individuals to food banks for the poor is in plastic bags.) And disposable bags are often used as trash can liners.

The tax wouldn't have stopped or limited our use of disposable bags when necessary; instead, it just would have forced us to purchase the same number of bags. City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young is correct in calling this tax regressive and harmful to those with limited funds. One physically handicapped neighbor on a small income has been hoarding disposable bags for months for fear of the proposed tax.

The inclusion of paper bags in the proposed tax proved that it was nothing but governmental greed, since paper bags are biodegradable and do not pollute.

Mary Catalfamo, Baltimore

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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