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News Opinion Readers Respond

Principals aren't parents [Letter]

After being regaled by The Sun's investigative report about the horrific attacks on teachers and what it is costing Baltimore, interim Schools CEO Tisha Edwards should put first things first. Sure, it's important that students show up for class ("Students cut school, principals disciplined," March 17), but it's more important teachers don't have to live in fear of being assaulted.

It is unfair that school principals are being held accountable for situations over which they have no control. And finding "creative ways" to lure kids to the classroom has been tried over and over again. Years ago, schools dispatched truant officers to homes of the chronically absent, but in light of this city's finances, it's unlikely an army to behavior enforcers will materialize any time soon.

And by the way, where are the hearings the Baltimore City Council promised on the subject of student violence? Ms. Edwards should be preparing statements and be ready to take questions from taxpayers like myself.

Rosalind Heid, Baltimore

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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