Summer Sale Extended! Get unlimited digital access for 13 weeks for $13.
Readers Respond
News Opinion Readers Respond

Not more arrests, better ones

What our citizens and neighborhoods want is good arrests and prosecution of those key perpetrators of violence and disruption among us ("Don't return to failed crime-fighting strategy," Sept. 22). That means deployment of "feet on the street" so that police officers know our neighborhoods well enough to help prevent crime and restore safety.

This proactive approach requires a systemic change that assigns enough dedicated officers to visibly patrol our neighborhoods and "stay put" long enough to know who we are, why we matter and who is disrupting our security. And the time needed to make key arrests that stick.

It will take a stable corps of neighborhood officers and a departmental policy shift to effect the neighborhood safety required. Such a shift requires more officers per district and incentives to stem the current tide of attrition which robs us of officers experienced enough to know how to police effectively and still fit enough to give chase.

No one goes into policing to get rich. But our officers do require the morale of being part of a positive team effort, the satisfaction of making a positive difference for neighborhoods and the guarantee of decent support upon injury or retirement. They didn't sign-up for desk jobs downtown, and they rarely go elsewhere based on higher salaries alone.

Reordering priorities to prevent crime is such common sense that it's radical. But so is the goal of attracting 10,000 new families in 10 years. They both are connected. "Neighborhoods First" is what counts in growing Baltimore City.

Mary Pat Clarke, Baltimore

The writer, a Democrat, represents the 14th District on the Baltimore City Council.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • End drug crime by banning cash

    End drug crime by banning cash

    I would like to make some comments on the "streets" as they are today ("Enablers of 'bad guys with guns' hard to trace," April 1). First and foremost, there is only one medium of exchange on the black market or underground economy and that would be cash, which is untraceable. I speak from experience...

  • City police mired in bureaucracy

    City police mired in bureaucracy

    I enjoyed reading your article, "No reward for store owner who provided top on robber (April 7), but not the substance of it. What was presented was just another piece of evidence that the police are nothing more than another bureaucracy.

  • Not so transparent

    Not so transparent

    A Baltimore City plan to create an online database listing the outcome of civil lawsuits alleging police brutality is being billed as a tool for making the department more transparent after a Sun investigation this summer revealed the city has paid out nearly $6 million to settle plaintiffs' claims...

  • Mayor is right about black-on-black crime

    Mayor is right about black-on-black crime

    Letter writer Tracy Stott seemingly does not readily accept reality. Her letter to The Sun takes on a personal vein in her response to Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake calling out all black men in Baltimore men regarding black-on-black homicide ("Mayor throws black men under the bus," March...

  • Where is the outrage over murders?

    Where is the outrage over murders?

    I awoke to the news that a 14-year-old was cut down in South Baltimore by yet another drive-by shooting ("14-year-old dead in Brooklyn double shooting," April 9). A senseless murder is terrible enough, but the drive-by shooters are the prime example of cowardice and hypocrisy. The trigger-puller...

  • On race, Batts is a divider

    On race, Batts is a divider

    As a lifelong Baltimore resident, I was dismayed to hear Commissioner Anthony Batts' negative opinion of race relations in our city ("Baltimore leaders agree: City has a race problem," March 14).

  • Black-on-black crime is not just a problem for blacks

    Black-on-black crime is not just a problem for blacks

    Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has sent a message to African-American men to step up and take responsibility for guiding black youths away from violence ("City leaders call on black men to mentor youths and stop the violence," March 25).

  • Why should race matter when we're all Africans?

    Why should race matter when we're all Africans?

    Thank to The Sun for putting our dirty laundry out on the line — er, front page — for all the world to see. Racism in Baltimore is nothing new, unfortunately ("Baltimore leaders agree: City has a race problem," March 14).

Comments
Loading
73°