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Readers Respond

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Forget about Lance Armstrong, enjoy the sport

Regarding Michael Hill's recent column on sports cheating, despite his Shakespearian rhetoric, no quarter should be granted to Lance Armstrong, who for over a decade willfully and systematically lied, cheated and thumbed his nose at ethical behavior ("Fans crave what cheating provides," Jan. 25).

Unfortunately, Mr. Hill's column promulgates the message of our country's increasingly influential sports and entertainment industry, which suggests that the primary role for the masses is to watch and be entertained by a small troop of elite athletes. Teddy Roosevelt is surely turning in his grave, knowing that in today's America the value of the common man is to be found not in the ring, but in the stands.

Sports should be fun, it should teach us life's lessons, it should build our self-esteem and provide an opportunity to interact with people from many walks of life. We should spend a little more time on our own bikes and less time being concerned with Mr. Armstrong and his.

Take the kids out for a ride, enter a local race, pledge to drop a few pounds. When possible, our sports focus should be on our own participation and that of our families, friends and community — not on the flawed achievements of yet another misguided celebrity.

Richard Hinton, Baltimore

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