Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99
News Opinion Readers Respond

Fewer nukes make financial, strategic sense

The recent editorial on arms control ("Avoiding Armageddon," Feb. 18) was exactly on point.

More than two decades have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and U.S. national security strategy has changed drastically. Yet many in Congress still refuse to heed the growing bipartisan chorus of former government officials and military leaders who argue that our current arsenal of approximately 5,000 nuclear weapons greatly exceeds U.S. security needs.

Our government plans to spend approximately $640 billion on nuclear weapons and related programs over the next decade. In an age of fiscal austerity, scarce dollars must address real threats like cyber-attack and terrorism, not programs with diminishing strategic relevance.

One nuclear weapon has the capacity to level an entire city, only a few — not thousands — are required for deterrence. Reducing the size of the arsenal makes both strategic and fiscal sense.

Kingston Reif, Washington

The writer is the director of non-proliferation programs at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation.

  • Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
  • Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
    Related Content
    • Baltimore must support summer learning opportunities
      Baltimore must support summer learning opportunities

      The Sun article "Baltimore school board debates summer school cuts" (March 25) elevates the critical issue of summer learning and the impact proposed cuts to programs like Read to Succeed will have on thousands of Baltimore youth and families. Eliminating summer programs will deeply affect...

    • Md. farmers are helping protect the bay
      Md. farmers are helping protect the bay

      The farmers in Baltimore County are more than agronomic professionals. Yes, we grow local fruits and vegetables, raise animals and tend to crops that provide the food, fuel and fiber to our community and the world. But did you know we also work every day to protect our waterways, soil and...

    • Baltimore embraces renewable energy
      Baltimore embraces renewable energy

      It was a particularly gloomy and rainy Thursday in Baltimore, but a certain solar press conference inside City Hall shone with the promise of renewable energy for the city. As reported by The Baltimore Sun ("Baltimore ranks 34th in nation for installation of solar panels," March 26),...

    • What millennials need from Baltimore
      What millennials need from Baltimore

      The willingness of millennials to move to urban areas will be the salvation of cities as long as the cities recognize what they have to do to keep them for more than a few years. To avoid future millennial flight ("City population shrinks slightly in new estimates," March 26), cities will...

    • Income inequality can't be fixed
      Income inequality can't be fixed

      In Dan Rodricks' column, "Beyond race, call for economic fairness" (March 30), he talks about income inequality and the 1 percent not paying their fair share. What he does not talk about is why they are paying less than the poor or lower middle class.

    • Short sales need a tax break
      Short sales need a tax break

      Despite the recovery of the economy since 2008, there are still many homeowners who owe more than their property is worth. A bill pending in the U.S. Senate would extend the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act through 2016, curtailing tax penalties for low- and middle-income homeowners and...

    Comments
    Loading