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News Opinion Readers Respond

Alonso was a failure

City schools CEO Andrés Alonso's performance was marked by, "a series of cheating scandals — found by the state to have taken place during the year the district's progress was most celebrated" and further under his tenure, "The system had paid $14 million in overtime over several years, with the top earner being Alonso's driver." ("City schools chief Alonso resigns," May 6.) This track record will help recruit the next "great urban education reformer"?

Lauding this man's "leadership," or I should say, "oversight," of Baltimore City schools, is bizarre. But The Baltimore Sun apparently missed their own irony in their editorial entitled, "Loss and opportunity."

Per Fiscal Year 2013 Adopted Operating budget, Baltimore City schools' total yearly revenues are in excess of $1.3 billion dollars.

It is a very good time for this reformer to go back to New Jersey. And it is an even better time for Baltimore taxpayers to find someone with a passion for ethics to actually reform the city's school system.

V.W. Kerr, Chestertown

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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