Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
NewsOpinionReaders Respond

Therapeutic foster care serves Md.'s neediest, most disabled youth

I was gratified to read your article on the strides Maryland has made toward reducing the number of children in foster care ("Nothing matters more … than a place to call home," Dec. 26).

Every child deserves a lifelong family, no matter their background or needs. Therapeutic foster care has been part of Maryland's child welfare system since 1986, and it serves some of the state's neediest and most disabled youth.

We are able to do so at a fraction of the cost of group care, and when we achieve permanency for youth who historically have been less likely to be adopted or reunified with their birth families, we save the state tens of thousands of dollars a year while giving children with special needs "forever families."

Providers who are members of the Foster Family-based Treatment Association Maryland Chapter are committed to working in collaboration with the state and with each other to provide homes to all youth who need them. At times, this will require a rethinking of what services are needed and the creativity to develop and fund them. But our goal of permanency for all is worth it.

Robert Basler, Bel Air

The writer chairs the Foster Family-based Treatment Association Maryland Chapter.

  • Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
  • Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
    Related Content
    • O'Malley's new phosphorous rules are key to a clean bay

      Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed rules to limit pollution from manure are good for everyone who wants clean water ("Phosphorus rules, finally," Nov. 18). Experts say the phosphorus management tool is one of the biggest opportunities to clean up the Chesapeake Bay and local waters in more than 30...

    • The real problem isn't the rats, it's the people who are careless with their trash
      The real problem isn't the rats, it's the people who are careless with their trash

      The main reasons for the rat infestation in Baltimore City are people not placing their refuse in durable trash cans with tight fitting lids and not cleaning up after their animals ("City to double its rat control patrols," Nov. 19).

    • Keystone XL is an outdated technology for meeting tomorrow's needs
      Keystone XL is an outdated technology for meeting tomorrow's needs

      It makes no sense to invest billions of dollars in a dead-end technology like the Keystone XL pipeline, which will be obsolete and of ever-declining value over the next dozen years as we burn up yet more of our dwindling fossil fuel reserves ("Keystone comes up dry," Nov. 19).

    • Kittleman comment shows what poor losers liberals are
      Kittleman comment shows what poor losers liberals are

      It was very snarky for you to say that Howard County Executive-elect Allan Kittleman's overturning his predecessor's ban on sales of sugary drinks on county property will "evidently be [Mr. Kittleman's] top priority" ("Kittleman's top priority," Nov. 18).

    • Larry Hogan, savior of Md. business
      Larry Hogan, savior of Md. business

      With the election of Larry Hogan as Maryland's next governor, we can all breathe a collective sigh of relief. So here's a "what if": How many more Maryland-based businesses would have fled our state after four years of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown as governor?

    • Since when did flowers become an environmental 'hazard?'
      Since when did flowers become an environmental 'hazard?'

      As I put my gardens to bed for the winter (my zinnia and cleome are still blooming, due to warm autumn days), I'm finally writing a letter I've been meaning to write since my court date in October, when I contested a hefty fine received from Baltimore's Environmental Control Board.

    Comments
    Loading