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Time for Peter Angelos to sell the Orioles

A letter to Mr. Peter Angelos:

With all due respect, I believe the time has come for you to give serious consideration to selling the Baltimore Orioles. The promises we as fans have been given to see changes for the better have never materialized. The culture of losing has become so ingrained in the ball players on your team, some have unconsciously learned to accept losing as being the norm. The addition of Buck Showalter last season was nothing more than putting a Band-Aid on a gaping wound.

Whatever you have attempted to do to improve the team has not worked, is not working, and will never work. I am not necessarily saying that Cal Ripken Jr. can play the role of Superman if he were to be named the majority owner. What I firmly is believe that change has to begin, and it must begin at the top. The franchise deserves it, despite what you may believe.

If the losing continues for a few more years, fans will ultimately stop supporting the ball club. (The only thing keeping the ball club afloat is that Camden Yards is still a national draw). The inevitable thought is that you would ultimately look to relocate the struggling franchise in another city after the novelty of Camden Yards wanes. The absolute last thing the city of Baltimore needs is to lose another major sports team. It would prove to be a debilitating blow to the city and surrounding region.

Mr. Angelos, step outside your cloistered existence. Can you not see the harm you are doing to the franchise by remaining the majority owner? You certainly would not want your legacy to parallel that of the late Robert Irsay, would you?

Patrick R. Lynch, Nottingham

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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