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Readers Respond

Baltimore needs BRT

Recently, Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford announced that Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) should be considered as an alternative instead of the now-shelved Red Line light rail system ("Who knew Hogan, Rutherford were such transit geeks," July 15). Why? Costs. Light rail is extremely expensive — to the tune of...

  • Breaking the cycle of poverty, one woman at a time

    Breaking the cycle of poverty, one woman at a time

    While I certainly agree with The Baltimore Sun's view on "Breaking the cycle of poverty" (July 27) and support the adoption of policies that would immediately put the brakes on the precipitous descent of our state's children into poverty, readers should know that workforce development organizations...

  • Another mass shooting, and who's responsible?

    Another mass shooting, and who's responsible?

    I am a cinema buff, and I went to the Charles Theatre recently to see a wonderful film. While there I realized that another mentally ill person decided to vent his furies in a movie theater. This time in Lafayette, La. ("La. shooter a drifter with 'hate in his heart,'" July 25). This is the USA,...

  • Updated toxic chemicals legislation is an advance

    Updated toxic chemicals legislation is an advance

    By urging rejection of bipartisan legislation to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act, Emily Scarr lets the perfect become the enemy of the good ("Updated chemical bill undermines state regulation," July 24). Her claim that the Senate bill is "so weak as to be almost useless" ignores its many...

Op-Eds

More op-eds
  • The perils of bail reform

    The perils of bail reform

    Recently, there has been much discussion in Maryland and nationally about reforming the bail system, but some policymakers and judges appear to be headed down a dangerous path that ultimately puts public safety at risk. These discussions are based on an abandonment of the concept of bail when releasing...

  • Response, recover and rebuilding Baltimore

    Response, recover and rebuilding Baltimore

    There have been many accounts of the city's response on April 27th and the days following. In this last of my six-column series, I'd like to share the story of the Baltimore City Health Department's immediate response and ongoing recovery efforts.

  • How to kill the summer job

    How to kill the summer job

    I had a lot of summer jobs. I was a foot messenger in New York for a couple of summers. I worked as a receptionist and mail room flunky. Before my junior year of high school, I briefly sold ice cream snacks — sort of yuppie bonbons — on the street for a company called Love Bites. The uniform was...

  • Unmasking Dr. Huxtable

    Unmasking Dr. Huxtable

    Like many African-American women, when I heard about the sexual assault accusations against comedian Bill Cosby I was shocked and disappointed. I had difficulty separating my memories of Bill Cosby and his popular '80s sitcom with the new picture that was emerging of a predator whose victims claimed...

  • In Baltimore, hope can be a dangerous thing

    In Baltimore, hope can be a dangerous thing

    On a warm summer Saturday last month, while many of you were relaxing with your families or running errands, I attended the funeral of a 16 year old.

Editorials

More editorials
  • Baltimore's mismatched schools

    Last year, Baltimore had 20 neighborhood elementary schools where enrollment was at least 25 percent greater than the state-rated capacity for their buildings, and it had 21 where enrollment was at least 25 percent below capacity. The most overcrowded elementary, John Ruhrah, had 369 more students...

  • Baltimore's forgotten corridors

    Baltimore's forgotten corridors

    The skeleton of Baltimore's newest skyscraper is rising along the waterfront at Harbor Point. A few blocks west, a long-delayed addition to the top of the Four Seasons building is underway. In the traditional central business district, things are also looking up — after decades as a parking lot,...

  • Closing Baltimore's jail

    Closing Baltimore's jail

    The Baltimore City Detention Center needed to close. Any discussion of Gov. Larry Hogan's surprise announcement Thursday that he was shuttering the facility needs to start with that. Yes, he should have consulted with the mayor and key members of the legislature about his plans beforehand — or...

  • Cincinnati officer indictment: Seeing is believing

    Cincinnati officer indictment: Seeing is believing

    Anyone who might still be harboring doubts about the effectiveness (and necessity) of police body cameras need only watch what spewed out of the camera attached to University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, who was arraigned on a murder charge today. The recording of Officer Tensing,...

  • Medicare at 50

    Medicare at 50

    Thursday marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, the compulsory federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled that this newspaper described as "just, humane and overdue" on the day it was signed into law. Today, more than 920,000 Marylanders are covered by Medicare, a small fraction...

More Letters to the Editor

  • Iran deal opponents seek war

    Iran deal opponents seek war

    The editorial, "A 'good enough' agreement" (July 24), correctly supports the nuclear deal between the West and Iran which will help to bring peace and stability to the Middle East, will bring both economic and political benefits to the U.S., and is supported by 60 percent of the American people....

  • Deinstitutionalization and the homeless

    Deinstitutionalization and the homeless

    Public-interest attorney Michael Millemann spearheaded a project in 1981 that removed 300 mentally disabled adults from institutions for the psychiatrically ill and found them appropriate placements.

  • Helping poor is what Jesus expects

    Helping poor is what Jesus expects

    I'm always grateful for the careful research and insights of Dan Rodricks' columns and for their consistent compassion.

  • Flawed history of Lee Park

    Flawed history of Lee Park

    In his letter ("The divisive history of Robert E. Lee Park's name," July 26), Garrett Power erroneously attempts to link the naming of Robert E. Lee Park to Robert Garrett, a former chairman of Baltimore City's Department of Recreation and Parks. In doing so, he references Mr. Garrett's segregationist...

  • Farmers are failing the bay

    Farmers are failing the bay

    Peter Jay's letter is a good example how far farmers will go to fight even the most reasonable idea to help restore the Chesapeake Bay's water quality ("Feds' proposed livestock fencing requirements are impossible to meet," July 27).

  • Maryland identified with Lee

    Maryland identified with Lee

    I wonder if any of the Marylanders who are clamoring for the name of Robert E. Lee Park to be changed to Lake Roland Park because General Lee was a Confederate realize that Maryland was a slave state.

  • Police are not the problem

    Police are not the problem

    In a recent letter to the editor, Richard Friedman touched upon a very sensitive nerve in his penultimate, and antepenultimate paragraphs as he references the effects of increased police presence on the streets ("How Baltimore can attack crime," July 21). Increasing the number of police on the...

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