Fells Point eatery to open downtown Towson location

Op-Eds

Election 2016: Who's scarier?

I have usually dismissed as willfully ignorant and downright irresponsible those people who tune out the news and eschew politics. But as we find ourselves in a pitched battle for the United States presidency, I am beginning to understand them. Each side — the Republicans and the Democrats — is...

  • Twice victimized: once by a man, once by the system

    Twice victimized: once by a man, once by the system

    As a seasoned social worker I've accompanied more women than I care to remember to report sexual assault, domestic violence or other abuse perpetrated against them or their children. Inevitably, the response we receive varies dramatically depending on the race, immigration status, socioeconomic...

  • The wrong way to select a vice president

    The wrong way to select a vice president

    No tradition in the history of American political party conventions is more sorely needed than the one abandoned in the mid-20th century — namely, the selection of a vice presidential nominee solely by the convention. Until the era of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the vice presidential selection...

  • Political parties split in attitudes toward Israel

    Political parties split in attitudes toward Israel

    Today's Republican and Democratic platforms amply illustrate serious divides between the two major parties' attitudes toward Israel, a factor that could play a major part in determining who wins the presidency. Foreign policy continues to be a pivotal point in many voters' minds — particularly...

Editorials

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Getting to yes on Port Covington

The proposed massive redevelopment of Port Covington enters what may be its most crucial phase tomorrow when the City Council holds what is expected to be the first in a series of public hearings and work sessions on Sagamore Development's request for $535 million in tax increment financing. The...

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  • Repairing our fractured country

    Repairing our fractured country

    On July 9, 1991, I was one of the newly minted plebes of the United States Naval Academy's Class of 1995. As we stood in formation in Tecumseh Court to take the oath of office as midshipmen in the U.S. Navy, we chose as our class motto: Non sibi sed patriae — "Not for self, but for country." We...

  • Ginsburg's right not to remain silent

    Ginsburg's right not to remain silent

    When Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg publicly revealed her negative opinion of Donald Trump, I posted the interview on my daughter's Facebook wall with the caption, "she never disappoints." Even before the backlash from liberals and conservatives, however, I had second thoughts: As a Supreme Court...

  • Baltimore County bill would end income discrimination against renters

    Baltimore County bill would end income discrimination against renters

    Myesha Allender was hit and paralyzed by a drunk driver in 2005, changing her life forever. She now uses a wheelchair and faces the great challenge of finding a suitable home for her family in a neighborhood connected to good schools for her four children. Ms. Allender is unable to work and relies...

  • Investing in Baltimore's future through summer jobs

    Investing in Baltimore's future through summer jobs

    This spring, the Obama administration announced that it would target Baltimore, along with 15 other cities, to increase the number of young people hired for summer jobs at federal workplaces. While this kind of support is a terrific starting point to engage our city's youth in meaningful, productive...

  • McKeldin family supports demolition of Baltimore's McKeldin Square

    McKeldin family supports demolition of Baltimore's McKeldin Square

    In the heart of downtown Baltimore is a park named for our father and grandfather, Theodore R. McKeldin, who served as Baltimore mayor for two separate terms (1943 to 1947 and 1963 to 1967) and Maryland governor from 1951 to 1959. It is an honor that recognizes his vision and hard work to revive...

  • Sharia followers aren't the problem, Newt is

    Sharia followers aren't the problem, Newt is

    In the wake of the horrible tragedy in Nice, France, Newt Gingrich has called for the deportation of Muslims who believe in the Sharia Law. So tell me, Mr. Gingrich, will you deport me when I say a prayer before I eat? When I give alms to the needy? Or when I greet my neighbor with a smile or take...

  • Forget the 1 percent, what about the 45 percent?

    Forget the 1 percent, what about the 45 percent?

    Inequality is the political trope du jour. Few would disagree that the U.S. economy is failing many if not most Americans, as some have moved into the economic fast lane while many are stalled or have exited the highway of opportunity. Donald Trump has called the U.S. economy "rigged," with "our...

  • Freddie Gray trials: Unethical prosecution of city officers?

    Freddie Gray trials: Unethical prosecution of city officers?

    Nuremberg taught us that a soldier cannot claim that he was "only following orders" to excuse illegal conduct; the soldier must refuse. Legal ethics impose a similar duty on subordinate lawyers. But mutiny is a difficult thing to ask of someone in an effective chain of command. This is the unenviable...

  • Whither Sanders' 'revolution'?

    Whither Sanders' 'revolution'?

    In his long-awaited endorsement of Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders' words were adequate but the music was missing. He used the occasion of a New Hampshire rally for her — in a primary state in which he had routed her — to put his own spin on the Democratic presidential campaign. Mr. Sanders characterized...

  • Ocean plan welcome, but overdue

    Ocean plan welcome, but overdue

    I think it is only fitting that the National Aquarium and the World Trade Center Baltimore sit side-by-side along the Inner Harbor. Both entities depend upon our oceans — one exists to inspire conservation of our world's aquatic treasures while the other serves as the center for international commerce...

  • Changing places, fostering empathy

    Changing places, fostering empathy

    When Anna Wintour, editor of Vogue, decided to do a feature on comic Amy Schumer for the July issue of the magazine, she came up with a novel idea: Each woman would change places for 24 hours. For English-born, urbane and sophisticated Ms. Wintour, that meant she had to "get up late, eat a bagel,...

  • The Baltimore City Council should oversee police disciplinary board composition

    The Baltimore City Council should oversee police disciplinary board composition

    During this past legislative session, the Maryland General Assembly made changes to the Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights that will allow civilians to sit on police department hearing boards starting Oct. 1st. What lawmakers didn't do, however, was remove the composition of trial boards...

  • Musical pathways to success

    Musical pathways to success

    Over the past year, there has been so much public attention focused on the unmet needs and lack of options for Baltimore's youth, and rightly so. It's a huge and critical challenge. The simple fact is that the systemic issues that have marginalized so many of our city's young people require many...

  • Donald Trump: leader of the Know Nothing Party?

    Donald Trump: leader of the Know Nothing Party?

    As we approach the Republican National Convention on July 18, presidential candidate Donald Trump's rocky relationship with the Republican Party has become even rockier. The Republican convention is traditionally a celebratory affair, a victory lap for the presidential candidate who has amassed...

  • In America, not everyone is free

    As an educator in an urban public school I talk to my students about racial profiling on a regular basis. They've experienced it, and so have I. My students know how it feels to watch people cross the street as they approach, and they know how it feels to be watched when they walk into a store....

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