Harbaugh, Reynolds defend Kaepernick's stance – even if they don't agree with it

Op-Eds

Clinton's image remains clouded by press conference phobia

My Webster's Dictionary defines "phobia" as "any persistent irrational and excessive fear of some particular thing or situation." That seems to fit Hillary Clinton's attitude toward the commonplace press conference, the traditional exchange between politicians and the news media. She reportedly...

  • Public defender: Baltimore's secret surveillance images could have exonerated innocent citizens

    Public defender: Baltimore's secret surveillance images could have exonerated innocent citizens

    As a public defender in Baltimore reading the Department of Justice's Aug. 10th report finding that the Baltimore City Police Department engaged in a pattern and practice of violating constitutional rights, I felt a glimmer of hope. Maybe the BPD would finally be forced into better practices. Maybe...

  • Are Hillary's emails Donald's lifeline?

    Are Hillary's emails Donald's lifeline?

    A judge's order that nearly 15,000 previously undisclosed emails from Hillary Clinton's private server may possibly be released has given Donald Trump's campaign a much-needed diversion to turn the public spotlight back onto her one glaring political vulnerability -- her trustworthiness. The order...

  • Presidential nominees minimize 'God talk' this year

    Presidential nominees minimize 'God talk' this year

    Appeals to religious voters are a staple of modern presidential campaigns. Yet “God talk” by the major party nominees has been largely quiet in this presidential campaign season, especially when compared to election cycles in the 1990s and 2000s. Religious identity nonetheless remains a key factor...

Editorials

More editorials

Sunny day politics

Gov. Larry Hogan claims the legislature is manufacturing a non-existent link between its choice of whether to approve $20 million in economic development loans to aerospace giant Northrop Grumman and the governor's decision not to spend about $100 million legislators had set aside for K-12 education...

More Op-Eds

  • Diversity in medical students now means better health care later

    Diversity in medical students now means better health care later

    American medical schools are suffering from a severe case of economic and racial homogeneity, which is fueling physician shortages in vulnerable communities. Doctors are most likely to work in areas that share their demographics. White medical students from wealthy backgrounds tend to return to...

  • No more secret surveillance on Baltimore citizens

    The Baltimore City Police Department, with direction from the FBI, has engaged in a practice of using machines that act as cell phone tower simulators to spy on its own citizens, in secret, and sometimes illegally. These cell site simulators are portable and allow the police to electronically connect...

  • Letters to my son, Andrew

    Letters to my son, Andrew

    You introduce yourself to me, the solitary stranger in the cafeteria. You're just being friendly. In the course of conversation, you ask, "How many children do you have?" And you are slightly disconcerted when I hesitate. Don't I know how many children I have? The answer, when it comes, is a shock....

  • Building a 'weather-ready' nation

    Building a 'weather-ready' nation

    Water is our most precious resource. It sustains and nourishes all life on earth and underpins our entire economy, from energy and agriculture to trade and recreation. Yet water also represents one of our greatest threats. Torrential downpours, flash and river flooding, droughts and other severe...

  • Nate Parker: Separating the art from the man

    Nate Parker: Separating the art from the man

    Nate Parker — actor, director, producer — has created a brilliant film that's set to open in October, "The Birth of a Nation." Publicity for the film has led to publicity about a sordid episode in Mr. Parker's otherwise inspiring biography: He and his co-writer were charged with sexually assaulting...

  • Jazzing up Baltimore, literally

    Jazzing up Baltimore, literally

    If someone were to ask you what you know about jazz music in Baltimore, I'm guessing that you might name some famous performers whose heyday was 50 to 90 years ago: Eubie Blake, Billie Holiday, Chick Webb, Cab Calloway, Ethel Ennis. If asked about great places to hear jazz, you might — if you had...

  • Policing black Baltimore

    Policing black Baltimore

    For the past 14 years, I have worked with men and women of all ages in Baltimore who live each and every day attempting mightily to overcome the struggles and obstacles related to their criminal records. They have vastly different life experiences, but most have two things in common: Almost all...

  • New Md. policies could lower cancer rate

    New Md. policies could lower cancer rate

    An estimated 30,990 Maryland residents will hear the words "You have cancer," this year alone. But, if state lawmakers take critical preventive measures now, they could keep thousands of people from hearing those same words in the future. Increasing funding for tobacco prevention and cessation...

  • Trump doubles down on Trump

    Trump doubles down on Trump

    Before it ever really got started, the makeover of Donald Trump from amateur political outsider to a controlled and controllable presidential candidate has now been ditched — by the Republican nominee himself. His Gotta Be Me declaration on Wisconsin television signaled the predictable end to the...

  • Science in the self interest

    Science in the self interest

    The day after a flood devastated Ellicott City, Gov. Larry Hogan toured Main Street to survey the damage. The flash flood occurred after a slow-moving summer thunderstorm let loose 6 inches of rain in two hours. But the damage wasn't entirely an act of nature: Ellicott City has flooded before,...

  • A case for Kathy Szeliga for U.S. Senate

    A case for Kathy Szeliga for U.S. Senate

    Keeping faith with American workers and national security: These are two critical yardsticks for choosing Maryland's next U.S. senator. Take the measurements, and the results will demonstrate that U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen is not the right person to represent our state in the Senate. He has forsaken...

  • A Baltimore tale: the murder of Patrolman John Dailey

    A Baltimore tale: the murder of Patrolman John Dailey

    Many longtime Baltimoreans were heartened by the beginning of construction on the 414 Light Street apartments last spring. Finally, after years of waiting for something substantive on the site, a new 44-story apartment tower will rise for hip city dwellers who can afford monthly rents of up to...

  • From 'good to great' economic development in Baltimore

    From 'good to great' economic development in Baltimore

    Economic development has been on the minds of Baltimore industry leaders, community advocates and those residents who have to live with its many impacts, including gentrification, increased property taxes, construction, displacement and end-product-benefits from which they feel excluded. There...

  • Protecting our protectors: police

    Protecting our protectors: police

    Recent events have confirmed the beginning of a social uprising in America that most law enforcement agencies are ill prepared to handle. As CEO of an international police training corporation, I have conducted extensive research on high-risk policing. For a current project, I compiled data on...

  • 'New nationalism' amounts to generic white identity politics

    'New nationalism' amounts to generic white identity politics

    To listen to both his defenders and critics, Donald Trump represents the U.S. version of a new nationalism popping up around the world. I'm not so sure. In a fairly representative analysis, Politico's Michael Hirsh explained the "new nationalism" as "a bitter populist rejection of the status quo...

79°