Try digitalPLUS for 10 days for only $0.99

Editorial

News Opinion Editorial

Smoking ban: A Howard County nanny state? Hardly.

Banning smoking in most workplaces, as Maryland did in 1995, was a major public health advance. So were the decisions by several counties and, in 2008, the state, to extend the ban to bars and restaurants. The ban on smoking in Howard County's parks, which County Executive Ken Ulman plans to announce tomorrow, not so much. Bartenders and waiters faced a real risk of health problems from secondhand smoke as a result of their work conditions, but a family going for a picnic in Centennial Park faces little or no danger from someone taking a puff 100 yards away. Even Dr. Peter Beilenson, the county's health officer, admits that the direct public health benefit of this move is modest.

Nonetheless, it is a good idea, and other jurisdictions and the state should follow Howard's lead, for two reasons.

The first is that while second-hand smoke is not a huge risk in a park, there is a broader public health principle at work. Smokers may complain that rules like the one Mr. Ulman is enacting create a stigma around smoking. If so, good. Relatively few people in Howard County smoke — about 9 or 10 percent of the population — but that is 9 or 10 percent too many. Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of disease and death, and the county has rightly determined that it should not be in the business of condoning it, even tacitly. Park rules are an expression of the county's values, and banning smoking in them is consistent with Howard's policy that the habit is not one it wants to encourage, or even enable.

The second reason is that smoking impedes non-smokers' right to the peaceful enjoyment of the public parks. Smokers may try to couch the rules as an impingement on their freedom, but they have the issue exactly backwards. Each individual's rights extend only until the point at which they impede someone else's rights. The presence of smoke in the air presents an annoyance to non-smokers, and it is reasonable to ban it in parks just the same as we prohibit loud music and rowdy behavior. It is certainly much more possible for non-smokers to avoid smokers in an open, expansive park than it is in a bar or office, but to expect them to do so presupposes that they should not be able to freely enjoy a park in the same way that a smoker can.

Tobacco is a legal product, and if adults want to be so stupid as to use it, they are free to do so. Howard's planned ban, doesn't change that, nor is it an example of nanny statism. The county is not telling people what to do or saying it knows best how they should live their lives. It is simply saying that it will not be a party to smokers' bad decisions, and that it will stand up for the rights of the 90 percent of its residents who don't smoke. It may not be a life-saver on the order of the existing bans on smoking in public places, but it's still worthwhile.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Health hazard posed by outdoor smoking is real

    Like Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, I am one of the over 17.5 million Americans with asthma, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. That is 7.7 percent of the population, almost as high a percentage as those who smoke in Howard County. So I read with dismay and surprise...

  • Howard Co.'s ban on smoking in parks won't end there

    The Sun's argument that an outdoor smoking ban is not the government as nanny is circular and wrong-headed ("Smoking ban: A Howard County nanny state? Hardly," July 12). On one hand The Sun allows that there is little if any possibility of secondhand smoke health problems for nonsmokers in outdoor...

  • Howard to ban smoking in county parks

    Howard to ban smoking in county parks

    First such prohibition in the state

  • The burdens of being black

    The burdens of being black

    I was born human more than a half century ago but also birthed with the burden of being black. I discovered racial discrimination early in life. I grew up among the black poor in Hartford, where a pattern of housing segregation prevailed. One city, but separated North end and South end on the basis...

  • Montgomery's sick leave experiment

    Montgomery's sick leave experiment

    Long before there was a statewide ban on smoking in restaurants, Montgomery County adopted such a restriction when it was still a pretty controversial step to take. Before the Maryland General Assembly approved widespread use of cameras to enforce traffic laws, Montgomery County already had them...

  • Partnerships improve health care in Maryland

    Partnerships improve health care in Maryland

    For decades, as health care costs continued to spiral upward and patients were stymied by an increasingly fragmented health care system, policy leaders, politicians and front-line caregivers strained to find a better way to care for people.

  • Mosby in Cosmo and Vogue [Poll]

    Mosby in Cosmo and Vogue [Poll]

    Was it wrong for city State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby to appear in Vogue and Cosmopolitan when she has concerns about publicity in the Freddie Gray case?

  • Baltimore's broken roadways

    Baltimore's broken roadways

    Baltimore's traffic congestion is awful, causing adverse quality of life and economic consequences. Add to that the effect on air quality and cost of health-related problems caused by vehicle pollution.

Comments
Loading

70°