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News Opinion

Trash-burning plant raises questions

I was surprised to see the article about the trash-burning power plant on Page 4A of the Saturday Sun ("As permits expired, work began on waste-to-energy plant in city," Aug. 10). It should have been on the front page of the Sunday Sun.

The article left so many questions unanswered. If the permits expired, why was construction permitted to begin? Other critical questions revolve around the pollution. How much pollution will the plant create and where will it go? Some financial questions include:

•Is the state or city contributing any tax breaks or loans to Energy Answers?

•Are there any purchase agreements (or other type of agreements) with the city or state?

•Will there be any infrastructure improvements provided by the city or state?

•Who will purchase the power?

Seems like a great topic for some in-depth investigative reporting on a project that will greatly effect our environment, public heath and quality of life.

I'm looking forward to reading more in my next Sunday newspaper.

Jerry Henger, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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