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Right-to-work laws benefit workers

Having read your editorial on right-to-work laws, I was amused by your use of such comparisons as "nations don't make taxes optional" ("Right to earn less," Dec. 13). People should have the right to work without having to pay someone else for the privilege.

Years ago, a speaker at a seminar out West commented to a group of CEOs that "if you have a union, you asked for it." Which I believe is true. Profit-sharing and other opportunities should be available to all workers. If sales go up, everybody should benefit; if they go down, everyone should get less.

I had the opportunity to work in such an environment for a short time, and I enjoyed it. I didn't get fired but changed jobs on my own and received a check from that fund.

I hear that most of the protesters in Michigan were trucked in from other states, that fights ensued and innocent bystanders were hurt. That's not a mentality we should be OK with. I'm suspicious of arguments warning of fewer jobs where right-to-work laws are in effect.

In all my working years I never needed anyone to "protect" me, and I certainly wouldn't be happy giving someone money to hold a convention party on my dime.

R. Ails, Joppa

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