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Supreme Court decision should be questioned [Letter]

Courts and the JudiciaryJustice SystemFreedom of the PressLobbying

In a letter in the Sun, Kelli Kirchner of Cumberland expresses her happiness with the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and seems to believe no one should question or try to change it ("Why is Mikulski trying to 'fix' the Supreme Court decision?" July 20). Well, I have news for her. As long as we have freedom of speech (as protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution), we will always be free to question and try to change (via legislation or constitutional amendment) any decision of any court. The decision of any particular Supreme Court is final only until it is changed by that court or a successor court composed of different justices who interpret the law in a different way.

Neither the First Amendment nor the "equal protection" clause has always been interpreted in the same way. This particular Supreme Court contains five justices who seem determined to remake the law to conform to their own right-wing religious preferences. That's obvious from the number of 5-4 decisions that have been rendered with the same five persons in the majority. But times change and those same five people will not always be there to work their will on the rest of us. And the rest of us are not obliged to simply roll over and accept without question or debate whatever they decide to impose on us.

Kenneth A. Stevens, Columbia

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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