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News Opinion

Holder's empty words on prisoners

So U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. is going to let out elderly prisoners who were supposed to be serving life sentences for capital crimes such as murder ("U.S. plans drugs shift," Aug. 12). I guess we were snookered again when we traded capital punishment for life in prison for crimes of murder. What has happened is that the convicted murderers have been cared for better than anyone on the outside.

Prison officials have come to the realization that more and more murderers are living long healthy lives behind bars and that so many have and are going to accumulate that we will end up having state and federal "Long Term Health Care Prisons," or "Assisted Living Prisons" for a growing population of old murderers. So the people in charge create the fiction of releasing "non-violent" older prisoners. Except they are not so non-violent just because they are older. James "Whitey" Bulger is 83, and during his recent trial a witness against him turned up dead.

As for the federal government not prosecuting small drug possession crimes, how many do they get as opposed to the cities and states? The overall preponderance of drug arrests are local. All we get are empty words.

Joseph Schvimmer, Pikesville

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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