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News Opinion

Principals will soon be chauffeurs, too [Letter]

It is so funny and at the same so sad to read about city principals getting punished for student absenteeism ("Students cut school, principals disciplined," March 17). I suggest that these principals get back in their cars and go and pick up these potential drop outs and on the way back to school stop by the fast food drive through window and get them some breakfast and, if there is time, they could swing by any local stationery store and pick up pens, notebooks and supplies. Don't worry about being late because, according to state guidelines, if they are there before its over, they are on time.

I'm not making this up. The Sun can easily check out the lateness rule. I would hope the Sun will print this, but as I've learned from many of my other letters, it is ignored because it doesn't fit the paper's editorial slant.

Roland Moskal

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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