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News Opinion

U.S. must not concede to Iran [Letter]

The deal reached over the weekend in Geneva is a huge mistake by the U.S. and one that will be regretted when we discover the Islamic Republic of Iran cannot be trusted.

In the past, the Obama administration has suggested it is willing and ready to use force to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear bomb, but now the White House has since early this fall pushed hard for a diplomatic solution — one of actually conceding to Iran.

Such an unwise breakthrough is likely to anger Israel and several lawmakers in Washington who argue that Iran has eluded international nuclear inspectors for years and cannot be trusted and have warned the Obama administration against rushing into a hasty and bad deal.

The United States and its allies, including Israel, which is not party to the talks but has been played a vocal role on the sidelines during recent weeks, have long suspected that Iran is enriching uranium to make a nuclear bomb.

Iranian leaders are lying that the program is purely for peaceful purposes, including for civilian electricity generation and medical research.

No concessions must be made or granted by the United States ever to Iran on that country's ambitions to create a nuclear weapon.

Al Eisner, Silver Spring

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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