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News Opinion

Sun treats Neuman badly over stormwater bill

I found your editorial on Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman's decision to veto the storm water bill very unprofessional ("Neuman's reckless stormwater veto," April 29). To disagree is one thing, but to call her decision "reckless" and to say that her action "represents a failure of leadership" is highly insulting.

She had the courage to temporarily veto the bill which would impact her county, but not touch other polluters, such as people in Western Maryland whose runoff from roofs, driveways and parking lots into streams and the Patapsco River can also lead to pollution. Why not make everyone that lives in Maryland pay the fee?

On the other hand, I am not so sure that the Chesapeake Bay is polluted mainly by storm runoff. What about all the tankers and other vessels that sail into the bay and flush their tanks to save money in the open waters? What about the fishermen and crabbers that use the bay as a garbage can? Perhaps we should limit the number of pleasure boats that use the bay, since they probably flush their toilets into the water to save cleaning them at dockside.

Finally, I live in Anne Arundel County and pay my fair share of taxes. To call residents of Anne Arundel County "famously tax-averse" is highly unjust.

Jerry Todd, Linthicum

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