Your editorial urging Maryland to see how marijuana legalization works out in other states before legalizing it here is reasonable — except that any future change in the law should be toward stricter, not more lenient, enforcement ("One step at a time on marijuana," Nov. 20).

There is already a lot of turmoil in the states that have legalized marijuana, and the publicity the issue has received, whether for so-called medical use or outright legalization, further misleads the country's youth to think marijuana is harmless.

National statistics show that very few people are in jail for only possession of a small amount of marijuana. Jail sentences either involve large amounts for selling, or more frequently, the commission of another crime or possession of another illicit drug in addition to marijuana.

Has The Sun done any research on arrests reported in its newspaper as to the number of people having been jailed for only possessing small amounts of marijuana?

One of the ways that marijuana is harmful is its use among people who drive under its influence. All drivers involved in accidents or who break traffic laws should be tested for marijuana and charged accordingly. This harmful drug should remain illegal.

Nancy Starr, Erie, Pa.

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