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Opinion

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Lexington Market should offer more locally grown produce

Like Baltimore author Patricia Schulteis, I too have fond memories of eating oysters with my grandfather at Faidley's seafood café in Lexington Market ("Loving Lexington Market," April 11).

What the market needs is what other great regional markets, such as Philadelphia's Reading Terminal Market or New York's Chelsea Market, offer: Food manufactured on-site.

The lack of local produce at Lexington Market betrays the disconnect the market currently labors under with today's foodies: The majority of the foods sold there have little connection to the location.

Mayor Rawlings-Blake could energize the consultants contemplating bidding on the market's request for proposals by committing to making food manufacturing more of a priority and job-grower in Baltimore.

Adam Borden, Baltimore

The writer is managing director of Bradmer Foods LLC.

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