Summer Sale! Get unlimited digital access for 13 weeks for $13.
Opinion
News Opinion

Sanctions won't stop Iran's nuclear program

Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi's five steps for dealing with Iran are steps to confrontation disguised as an alternative to war ("Five steps to isolate Iran," Dec. 6). Sanctions are self-evidently counter-productive as a means to stop or alter Iran's nuclear research and development when the motive behind sanctions is punishment or regime change. The premise of the sanctions — that the problem is with Iran exclusively — ignores the nuclear neighborhood that Iran lives in and our own desire to dominate the region.

There's no shortcut to sincere negotiations to resolve differences and to prevent an escalation of differences. But negotiation efforts by the U.S. premised on preconditions are doomed to failure. If we really want peace with Iran instead of Middle East hegemony based on the threat and exercise of force, than we'll stop pushing sanctions guaranteed to fail and get down to business. Nothing better demonstrates America's growing military orientation than our refusal to do so.

John G. Bailey, Edgemere

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Russia and China won't enforce Iran's deal with the U.S.

    Russia and China won't enforce Iran's deal with the U.S.

    Does letter writer Joseph Szot actually believe that Russia and China, Iran's potentially two largest trading partners, won't overlook any violation of its commitments — including halting nuclear weapons development — in order to continue unfettered trade with that country ("Iran likely to keep...

  • Iran's dangerous game

    Iran's dangerous game

    With less than a month to go before negotiators for the U.S and its partners are supposed to reach a deal limiting Iran's nuclear program, the talks appear to have stalled over Tehran's resistance to allowing inspectors to visit Iranian military bases and other sites to verify compliance with any...

  • Wishful thinking about the U.S. deal with Iran

    Wishful thinking about the U.S. deal with Iran

    Regarding Ray McGovern's commentary "Is the 'military option' on Iran off the table?" (July 20), much as we'd like to believe this is a good deal for the U.S., the facts suggest otherwise.

  • Iran deal a 'Pandora's Box'

    Iran deal a 'Pandora's Box'

    If we believe that Iran will cease its nuclear program and its support for international terrorism after the agreement is signed, we are living in a fool's paradise ("Sen. Ben Cardin says U.S. negotiators got 'awful lot' in Iran deal," July 23). The argument that Iran will no longer develop nuclear...

  • Cardin, Mikulski should stand up to Obama and reject Iran deal

    Cardin, Mikulski should stand up to Obama and reject Iran deal

    Contrary to the letter "Ben Cardin needs to make up his mind and support the Iran deal" (Aug. 5), this is the time for Sens. Ben Cardin and Barbara Mikulski to demonstrate that they are a statesman and stateswoman respectively and not simply political supporters of President Barack Obama. Their...

  • Congress should have a say in any Iran deal

    Congress should have a say in any Iran deal

    Under normal circumstances, Congress should not get involved in preliminary treaty negotiations, since it has the option of refusing to pass the document by not mustering a two-thirds vote of approval.

  • U.S. negotiations with Iran are a dangerous farce

    U.S. negotiations with Iran are a dangerous farce

    Having missed a July deadline for reaching an agreement with Iran over its nuclear program, the six world powers party to the talks -- the United States, Russia, China, France, United Kingdom and Germany -- have set November 24 as their new deadline. Iran says there will be no extension if a deal...

  • Iran is not at fault for stalled nuclear talks — Israel is

    Iran is not at fault for stalled nuclear talks — Israel is

    Unfortunately, the skilled Iranian negotiators have already won the game against a concession-minded P5-1 array of nations headed by the United States ("Iran's dangerous game," June 5). With funds now flowing into Iran and even more lucrative trade agreements being discussed with that nation, Iran...

Comments
Loading
74°