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Opinion

News Opinion

Don't our children deserve armed protectors?

Letter writer Robert V.P. Davis opposes arming school teachers based on his limited experience in the Army and a nighttime military exercise gone wrong ("Arm teachers? No way," April 11).

I was in the Army but finished my 32-year military career in the Air Force because my limited experience with the quality of Army people and training was poor. Does that mean that the quality of all Army people and training is poor? Of course not.

Mr. Davis further noted that during a 2011 shootout involving police outside a local nightclub, the hit rate by officers was poor even though "these are men and women who work year 'round to perfect their weapons skills."

The fact is police do not "work year 'round to perfect their weapons skills." At best the average cop may go to the range twice a year — that is one of the primary reasons for their terrible accuracy rates.

Citizens who carry a gun frequently practice at a range monthly — sometimes weekly — and the data shows that accidental shootings by ordinary citizens are extremely rare.

The data also show that an innocent citizen has a five times greater chance of being shot by a law-enforcement officer than by a legally-carrying citizen. That's what the night club shootout confirmed.

It's time for educated people to take emotions and bias out of the discussion and stick to data and facts, which are readily available.

We protect our money, our president, our national resources and our national security with guns. Aren't we and our children just as important and in need of protection?

Steve Bonning

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