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Poor baby fox was doomed from birth

I am in total agreement with Kim R. Filer ("Authorities too quick to kill rescued baby fox" May 7). This poor baby fox was doomed from birth. First by an accident that put him in harm's way and then by "authorities" who had to show their big nasty hand of power to kill. How sad for those who have so little care and empathy for creatures who are at mercy of men who couldn't even take a week to see if the fox was a rabies carrier before snuffing out his little life.

Mary-Jo Dale, Baltimore

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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