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Opinion

News Opinion

Why we are leaving Maryland: A farm wife's story

After a lifetime in Maryland, my husband and I have come to the conclusion to put our farm on the market. Due to the burden of new regulations and the financial burden of higher taxes, we can no longer afford to live in this state.

While lawmakers in Annapolis struggle to pay for their excessive spending while furthering their own political agendas, we are the ones being penalized. Whether it be higher taxes on gasoline, higher costs to citizens in order to facilitate illegal immigration, speed-camera rip-offs or new fines and penalties for lawful firearms ownership, we are watching our income dwindle.

We are law-abiding, taxpaying citizens, and we have been aggressive contributors to our community. After careful consideration and much anguish, we find there is really no alternative to this decision.

If enough citizens feel the same way we do, the only people left in Maryland will be those who don't contribute to society and criminals in possession of illegal firearms.

This is certainly is not the same state in which we grew up, and it is not the place in which we choose to continue to live.

Sandi Clisham, Parkton

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