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News Opinion

Corruption is endemic in Baltimore

What a bombshell — more corruption in the state of Maryland ("Corruption alleged at jail," April 24).

From what I read, we really do have the inmates running the asylum. It seems that public safety department secretary Gary D. Maynard is totally clueless as to who is really in charge there.

But should anyone be surprised to see another case of corruption in this state?

Citizens have already seen former Queen Mayor Shelia Dixon resigning with a full pension after she was found to have used gift cards on herself that were meant for the needy. She was also able to arrange for her relatives to get some nice no-bid contracts from the city.

Next, we saw the city school system spend more than $250,000 to remodel the offices of its information technology chief. Schools CEO Andres Alonso dismissed that as "a bad judgment call."

Then we find out all the while Mr. Alonso had his own personal chauffeur, who is costing the city thousands of dollars in overtime. Was that just another "bad judgment call?"

Finally, we saw 17 Baltimore City police officers charged with steering crash victims to the Majestic Auto Repair shop as part of a kickback scheme and current Queen Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake treating her privileged guests to $3,000 worth of food in the city's skybox.

Move over, Chicago and Newark, N.J. You've got nothing on Baltimore as far as corrupt politicians and "public servants" go.

Brian Spector, Easton

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