Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
News Opinion

Baltimore is being sapped of its vitality by the heavy hand of government

Residents of the city are used to surviving under the burden of a high cost of living index. We are also used to the heavy-handedness of government in a region dependent on government employment levels and proximity to Washington.

Private-sector employees, who do not receive automatic yearly raises and are not cushioned from the real economy by a blanket of comprehensive government fringe benefits, read the newspaper every day in dread of learning about the next government drain on their over-extended pocketbooks.

In the last year we have had: A Baltimore speed camera debacle, resulting in $100 million in fines and counting.

Water and sewer increases of 9 percent, to an estimated $1,276 for a family of four, which has doubled over the last 10 years.

A storm water remediation fee, newly established at $79 per household and set to increase every year as its cousins at the Department of Public Works have.

A bottle tax increase from 2 cents to 5 cents per bottle, and a trash fee recently proposed for those in the city who already pay the maximum income and real estate tax rates.

Private sector employees, who work at companies that are struggling in this poor economy, can only hope their employer is making more money this year than last, or there will be no chance for increased compensation in any form.

The infinitely elastic rubber band of taxpayer funds viewed by our public servants may finally snap.

Gary Moyer, Baltimore

  • Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
  • Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
    Related Content
    • City Hall theater
      City Hall theater

      No sooner had the Baltimore City Council taken a strong step in defiance of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's promised vetoes of two controversial bills Monday night than they announced their intentions to cave under the pressure and let her have her way. The council, it seems, is an...

    • The message from voters
      The message from voters

      It appears that some of the long-serving politicians who have been addicted to tax and spending increases may have heard the message from voters that it's not their money and we are tired of them wasting our tax dollars ("Rawlings-Blake to create 'tax reform' task force," Nov. 11).

    • Tired of sticking up for a city that doesn't stick up for me
      Tired of sticking up for a city that doesn't stick up for me

      Recently, a large semi-truck took off the back end of my car, which was parked right next to a "no trucks" sign on Toone Street in Canton. The entire experience was surreal, but initially I was fine because I was just relieved that no one was injured in any way. The truck driver was nice and...

    • Minor privilege, major disincentive [Editorial]
      Minor privilege, major disincentive [Editorial]

      Our view: If Baltimore is serious about fostering investment and growth, it needs to stop charging businesses for the privilege of existing here

    • End the city pension fight [Editorial]
      End the city pension fight [Editorial]

      Our view: Baltimore's police and fire unions should recognize that a settlement, not more litigation, is in their members' best interest

    • Baltimore's brighter budget [Editorial]
      Baltimore's brighter budget [Editorial]

      Our view: Tough decisions made during the last few years put the city in a position to cut taxes and maintain government services

    Comments
    Loading