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News Opinion

Sun ignores city violence [Letter]

Nothing illustrates The Sun's blindness to safety on Baltimore's streets than two items in the newspaper in recent weeks.

The letter from Carol Baker ("Safe in Baltimore," Jan. 18) was an answer to Eileen Pollock's previous piece on the lack of safety for Baltimore's citizens. Ms. Baker provides her personal evidence about living in Baltimore for 30 years and never being mugged and other quality of life benefits for living here and suggests Ms. Pollock should move away if she's so concerned.

Yet just four days before printing this item, Jon Fogg, a sportswriter for The Sun, was smashed in the head with a brick close to his home in Canton, and his car and laptop were stolen. Omitted from the headline of the recent article about his recovery ("Canton man recovering from skull fractures after attack," Jan. 22) is that Mr. Fogg works for The Sun.

One would think The Sun would wait until his recovery before printing Ms. Baker's blessings on safety in Baltimore. One would think that The Sun would know one of its employees is in the hospital with a fractured skull, missing and damaged teeth and other injuries when they printed Ms. Baker's response about safety. One would think, like many another business that cares for its employees, that The Sun would print a notice of reward for information leading to the arrest of the violent attacker of one of their employees.

Finally, one would think that The Sun would be honest about safety in Baltimore and call for civic authorities to address more than the continuing rise in the murder count, telling them that it doesn't help to state that "violent crime" is decreasing in Baltimore.

Charles Herr, Baltimore

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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