Unlimited Access. Try it Today! Your First 10 Days Always $0.99

Opinion

News Opinion

Capping carbon dioxide emissions is crucial [Letter]

Although recent national news has focused on the latest political events and gun attacks, the Obama administration's new rules forcing reductions in carbon dioxide emissions from power plants is far more important ("Carbon rules can work," June 2).

Carbon dioxide traps sun-heated air at the earth's surface, raising temperatures and sea levels. As 2003's Hurricane Isabel and later Superstorm Sandy showed us, places like historic Annapolis, Fells Point and the entire Eastern Shore of Maryland — not to mention the Jersey Shore and New York City — could be inundated in years to come. Parts of Norfolk, Va., are already being abandoned due to frequent flooding.

Sudden, intense rainstorms have become more frequent to the point that I keep my convertible covered with a tarp whenever I'm not driving it. We can't afford to delay action any longer, especially since Maryland is affected by emissions from Midwestern power plants.

The day after the new federal standards were announced, China also declared it would cap carbon dioxide emissions at 2016 levels. That was a major step. Developing nations like China and India will more likely act if already prosperous areas like the United States and Europe show a true commitment to make tough choices.

Soon the Environmental Protection Agency will begin accepting public comment on the regulations, so don't remain passive. Tell the EPA you favor the new rules and even stronger action to prevent eventual catastrophe.

Larry Carson, Columbia

-
To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Protecting Alaskan wilderness
    Protecting Alaskan wilderness

    Based on the reactions of Alaska Republicans, one might think that President Barack Obama had decided to unilaterally ban guns and snowmobiles from the 49th state instead of merely proposing to upgrade the protected status for certain federally-owned land from "national wildlife refuge" to "wilderness...

  • Climate change threatens the world's oceans
    Climate change threatens the world's oceans

    As we approach Earth Day on April 22, the U.S. pledge to cut its carbon emissions by up to 28 percent by 2025 is certainly cause for optimism. However, one reason why climate change merits urgent action is often overlooked: ocean acidification.

Comments
Loading

63°