Summer Sale Extended! Get unlimited digital access for 13 weeks for $13.
Opinion
News Opinion

Miss America pageant sends the wrong message

One element of the Miss America Pageant went horribly wrong Sunday evening. Miss America is supposed to be a beautiful, hardworking woman who serves as a role model for others. Yet Gretchen Carlson, Fox News personality and a former Miss America herself in 1989, announced that the contestants were so used to depriving themselves that they likely had not consumed a single carbohydrate in six years.

After Ms. Carlson made the comment, trays of doughnuts were brought out for the women who had been eliminated in the contest. Not only did this send a message of disordered eating habits, skewed self-concept and misaligned body image for impressionable teens, it also signaled that it's OK to feed failure with unhealthy desserts.

Vulnerable young girls and teens watching the pageant now may believe that in order to be a beautiful and worthy American woman they mustn't eat carbs and should deprive themselves nutritionally.

But Miss America should be known for eating a healthy, balanced diet and exercising regularly. She should not be famous as a woman who deprives herself.

A new and different message needs to be sent to American youngsters if we are to stop a growing trend toward disordered eating habits and an attitude of personal hatred toward ones own body.

Melanie Francer, College Park

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • O'Malley wants to waste our money on offshore wind

    O'Malley wants to waste our money on offshore wind

    When is Gov. Martin O'Malley going to be satisfied? He has spent all of Maryland's taxpayer dollars and then some since being elected, and now he wants to spend even more on wind power from the ocean, despite having been elected in part on a campaign promise to reduce spending ("O'Malley readies...

  • Gun debate hearkens back to the Wild West

    Gun debate hearkens back to the Wild West

    I am a tree-hugging Democrat, but the hysteria about gun control is driving my adult children into the arms of the National Rifle Association ("Marylanders strongly support two gun control measures," Jan 14). They are so vocal about their opposition to gun control that I suggested they make money...

  • To reduce gun violence, decriminalize drugs

    To reduce gun violence, decriminalize drugs

    Much of the violence in this country is due to drugs, but no one ever speculates about possible solutions. If we could find a way to decriminalize drugs we could eliminate much of the violence here and possibly in Mexico as well.

  • New Delhi rapes have their counterparts in America

    New Delhi rapes have their counterparts in America

    In my teens and early 20s I lived in Chennai, India, where despicable and lewd male behaviors were lumped together under the umbrella term "Eve teasing" ("Defendants' lawyers in the spotlight in Indian rape case," Jan. 13). I remember walking down a street with a friend, engrossed in a conversation,...

  • Ravens on a roll

    Ravens on a roll

    A former announcer for the Baltimore Colts, Chuck Thompson, had a phrase: "Any given team can win on any given Sunday."

  • The Mandel legacy

    The Mandel legacy

    Marvin Mandel passed away on Sunday at the age of 95, but his legacy lives on, not only in his successes as governor but for his willingness to manipulate the legislative process to benefit his circles of friends who were, in turn, quite generous to him. Marylanders should not forget either side...

  • O'Malley's sweetheart deal

    O'Malley's sweetheart deal

    When Martin O'Malley left the governor's mansion in January, he and his wife were allowed to buy for $9,638 dozens of pieces of furniture the taxpayers had spent $62,000 to purchase, most of it eight years earlier, on the grounds that it was "junk" that would otherwise have been thrown away. Those...

  • Is Hillary 'likable enough'?

    Is Hillary 'likable enough'?

    Seven years ago, 2008 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Hillary Clinton of New York, in a New Hampshire primary debate, was asked about her personal appeal. Her prime opponent, Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois, cheekily interjected: "You're likable enough, Hillary."

Comments
Loading
70°