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News Opinion

Clean up the bay before it's too late [Letter]

I am writing in response to Chris Wood's commentary about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("Trout, the bay — and your drinking water — at risk in the Senate," June 18).

As a girl raised for more than 13 years in Maryland, I grew up boating, crabbing and swimming in the bay and the Severn River, and I am deeply saddened to see how the bay's health has declined since then.

The Chesapeake Bay produces 500 million pounds of seafood a year. I have experienced this firsthand when I caught blue crabs for our family dinner many nights. Because of pollution from wastewater treatment plants, runoff and air pollution, the bay has developed dead zones that are choking off the marine life there.

Besides the bay being a food source and habitat for sea life, its watershed is also home to more than 17 million people. So the pollution not only is affecting wildlife but humans as well.

I love Maryland and feel that the Chesapeake Bay is one of the state's many gems. I urge Marylanders to support the Environmental Protection Agency's efforts to close loopholes in the Clean Water Act so that not only Maryland's precious water is saved, but water around the country as well.

Caroline Kennedy, Washington, D.C.

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To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com. Please include your name and contact information.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
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