Get unlimited digital access to baltimoresun.com. $0.99 for 4 weeks.
News Opinion

Lockheed Martin inks Australian wave energy deal

Lockheed Martin Corp. announced Tuesday that it signed a contract to develop the world's largest wave energy project off Victoria, Australia, calling it a "significant step toward making ocean energy commercially available."

The New Ventures office of Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems and Training Baltimore site signed the deal with Victorian Wave Partners Ltd. to develop a 62.5-megawatt peak power wave energy generation project.

The project will use a wave energy converter buoy pioneered by Ocean Power Technologies of Pennington, N.J. As the buoy moves up and down on waves, the mechanical energy drives an electrical generator, which is sent to shore through underwater cables.

The project is to be built up in three stages, with the initial phase producing about 2.5-megawatt peak power. Once completed, it is expected to produce enough energy to meet the needs of 10,000 homes.

Wave power devices draw energy from the motion of ocean waves, which is more predictable and consistent than wind and solar sources, said Lockheed Martin, the Bethesda-based defense contracting giant.

"We are applying our design and system integration expertise to commercialize promising, emerging alternative energy technologies, including ocean power," said Tim Fuhr, director of ocean energy for Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems and Training business.

Lockheed Martin will provide project management, design services for manufacturing the buoy technology, produce components of the buoys and perform system integration of the wave energy converters.

Copyright © 2015, The Baltimore Sun
Related Content
  • Pictures: Earth in Crisis
    Pictures: Earth in Crisis

    A global look at green living

  • Under Armour's gift
    Under Armour's gift

    Under Armour evidently wants to get into the law enforcement officer uniform business, and they have what sounds like a scheme to get free marketing and field testing of their new products by outfitting one Baltimore police district with them for free. Sounds like a great idea to us, yet the...

  • Does Maryland have the political will to restore the bay?
    Does Maryland have the political will to restore the bay?

    On Oct. 4, Jay Sadowski, an avid fisherman and hunter, died of leukemia at age 59. The cancer was discovered while he was being treated for a flesh-eating infection he contracted while fishing in the South River near where Gov. Larry Hogan lives. The infection ravaged his body even before the...

  • Netanyahu invitation unwise
    Netanyahu invitation unwise

    Once upon a time, not so long ago, the Republican party was generally thought of as the party of national security. The final years of Ronald Reagan's administration, successful arms control talks and masterful handling of the collapse of the Soviet Union by George H.W. Bush strengthened that...

  • Volunteers are needed year round, not just during the holidays
    Volunteers are needed year round, not just during the holidays

    For many families, groups of co-workers and friends, and individuals, volunteering is one of the most meaningful winter traditions. During the December holiday season, they may serve meals or collect food and clothing. In January, the Martin Luther King, Jr. national Day of Service is wonderful...

  • Death penalty for certain cases? [Poll]
    Death penalty for certain cases? [Poll]
Comments
Loading