Become a digitalPLUS subscriber. 99¢ for 4 weeks.
News Obituaries

Peter Winkenwerder, farmer

Peter Winkenwerder, a retired financial consultant and Baltimore County farmer, was killed June 6 in an automobile accident on Greenspring Avenue in Owings Mills. He was 73.

Mr. Winkenwerder was taken to Sinai Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, said his companion of 23 years, Elisabeth Albert "Betsy" Hayes.

The son of Dr. Walter K. Winkenwerder, who had been in charge of the allergy and infectious disease clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Eleanor Zouck Winkenwerder, a social worker and artist, Peter Winkenwerder was born in Baltimore and raised on his grandfather's Glyndon farm.

He was a 1960 graduate of Gilman School, where he played varsity baseball and was a member of the wrestling team.

In 1964, he earned a bachelor's degree in geography from the University of Virginia. He did postgraduate work in biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University, which led to a lifelong interest in genetics and medicine.

Mr. Winkenwerder enlisted in the Army in 1966, and after training, served in counter-intelligence in Vietnam. "As an undercover operator, he was among those who predicted that the Tet Offensive would occur," said Ms. Hayes.

After being discharged from the Army in 1969, Mr. Winkenwerder had planned to become a doctor.

"The war had changed his goal of following in his father's footsteps in becoming a doctor," said Ms. Hayes.

He earned a master's degree in 1974 from what is now Loyola University Maryland.

During the 1970s, he was treasurer of Arundel Sales & Services, and after leaving the company in 1978, he remained a company director. From 1981 to 1989, he was controller and treasurer of Tobacco Technologies Inc.

After retiring, Mr. Winkenwerder managed a 66-acre Glyndon farm that had been in his family for three generations. He planted trees, especially walnut trees, and made apple cider and apple butter for friends. He also enjoyed painting houses and barns and chopping wood.

An accomplished player of the five-string banjo, Mr. Winkenwerder was a bluegrass fan and especially liked the music of Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs and The Weavers.

He enjoyed playing golf and fishing. For the last 20 years, he had vacationed on Nantucket.

Plans for a celebration of life gathering are incomplete.

In addition to Ms. Hayes, Mr. Winkenwerder is survived by a sister, Joanne W. Rienhoff of Granby, Colo.; and many cousins.

fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
Comments
Loading