Paul M. Dubeau, retired banker, dies

Paul M. Dubeau, who rose from a bank teller to become vice president of the old Baltimore Federal Savings and Loan Association, died Aug. 13 of congestive heart failure at his Rodgers Forge home.

He was 86.

Paul Marshall Dubeau was the son of Archibald Dubeau, an Olin Mathieson chemist and salesman, and Helena Dubeau. He was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, and was raised in Lewiston, N.Y., and Rumford, R.I.

He was a graduate of Northfield Mount Herman School in Mount Herman, Mass., and attended Brown University.

His parents moved to Baltimore in 1952, and Mr. Dubeau began his banking career in the mid-1950s working as a teller at the old Baltimore Federal Savings and Loan Association, later Baltimore Federal Financial. He eventually rose to become vice president of the bank. He retired in 1985.

Mr. Dubeau received an MBA from Loyola University Maryland in 1976.

Family members said it was a No. 11 Baltimore Transit Co. bus that brought Mr. Dubeau together with Charlotte Naulty, who became his wife.

“Mom ... lived on Blythewood Road, and Dad lived on Boxhill Lane, and they caught the same bus at Wyndhurst and Charles Street,” said a son, Robert L. Dubreau of The Orchards. “That’s where they met and fell in love.”

They married in 1958 and settled into a home on Regester Avenue in Rodgers Forge, where they lived for the rest of their lives. Mrs. Dubeau died in April.

In addition to collecting Canadian stamps, Mr. Dubreau enjoyed thoroughbred racing and going to the track every Thursday, said his son. He was also a regular at the Peppermill Restaurant in Lutherville.

A Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. Monday at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St.

In addition to his son, Mr. Dubeau is survived by two other sons, Peter M. Dubeau of Cross Keys and David P. Dubeau of Rodgers Forge.

— Frederick N. Rasmussen

fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com

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