Marjorie F. Scott, Quaker and community activist, dies

Marjorie F. Scott, a community activist who had been executive secretary of the Baltimore office of the American Friends Service Committee, died of heart failure Feb. 8 at her home in the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville.

She was 94.

Marjorie Forbush was born in Baltimore, the daughter of Bliss Forbush Sr., who was headmaster of Friends School from 1943 to 1960, and Laverne Forbush, a homemaker.

She was raised in Govans and Roland Park and graduated in 1941 from the George School in Newtown, Pa. She then attended a business school.

In 1944, she married Harry S. Scott Jr., owner of Harry S. Scott Inc., a printing company. He died in 2010.

For 17 years until she retired in the 1980s, Mrs. Scott had been executive secretary of the Baltimore office of the American Friends Service Committee. Earlier, she had worked for her husband’s company, as well as for the state’s Industrial Accident Commission and the Baltimore Health Department’s Bureau of Tuberculosis

Her deep Quaker faith defined Mrs. Scott’s life. She had been a lifetime member of the Park Avenue meeting and later was a member of the Stony Run meeting. For years, she had been active with the yearly gathering of the Religious Society of Friends and had served as clerk of its interim meeting.

Mrs. Scott was active with the Adult Young Friends organization and had been a national board member of the American Friends Service committee. She had also been a member of executive committee of the Middle Atlantic Region, and served on its committee on national legislation.

She had been chair of the Young Friends Fellowship conferences of the Friends General Conference, and served as registrar. She was also a trustee of the Friends School of Baltimore.

Her civic activities included serving as board president of AIDS Interfaith Residential Services and an officer with the YWCA of Greater Baltimore. She organized the first YWCA convocation on racial justice. She was a member of the Mental Hygiene Society of Maryland and volunteered at Springfield State Hospital Center in Sykesville, Planned Parenthood of Maryland and at the city’s women’s detention center.

She also served as a member of the Baltimore City Foster Care Review Board and had been treasurer of Offender Aid and Restoration of Baltimore.

Mrs. Scott was a member of the Women’s Club of Rodgers Forge and a former president of the Maryland Federation of Women’s Clubs.

The former North Baltimore and Mount Washington resident moved to Broadmead 30 years ago. She had been president of its resident’s association and chaired its annual New Year’s Eve celebration and barn sale.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Broadmead, 13801 York Road.

Mrs. Scott is survived by a son, Harry S. Scott III of York, Pa.; two daughters, Mary Roberta Scott-Macnow of Asheville, N.C., and Lis Salfiti of Ambler, Pa.; five grandchildren; and numerous great-grandchildren.

--Frederick N. Rasmussen

fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com

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