Anthony Scaletta, pharmaceutical sales consultant

Anthony Joseph “Tony” Scaletta, who owned a pharmaceutical consulting business and was a Roland Park Baseball Leagues coach, died of brain cancer July 6 at his Ruxton home. He was 55.

Born in Fairfield, Iowa, and raised in the Chicago suburbs, he was the son of Nancy and Alfred Scaletta. He was a graduate of Lake Zurich High School, where he was football team captain and played baseball. He earned a sales and marketing degree at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University. He belonged to Sigma Chi fraternity.

While attending Indiana, he met his future wife, Rebecca “Becky” Manning, on a blind date. They went Christmas caroling that night and married June 28, 1991, in Cleveland.

Mr. Scaletta joined Baxter Health and sold medical supplies. After a few years working there, Mr. Scaletta became frustrated — he had been passed over for a promotion.

“He came home that day and slapped an atlas on the table and said, ‘We’re outta here. Where do you want to go?’ He picked out five cities he would consider moving to — Baltimore, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Cleveland or St. Louis,” his wife said. “The criteria was they each had to have a National Football League team, a baseball team and theater and opera.”

He joined Cardinal Health, where he managed buying pharmaceuticals for national accounts. He worked from an office on Lee Street in the Inner Harbor and later commuted weekly to headquarters in Dublin, Ohio.

With partners, he founded Generisys LLC, a pharmaceutical supply chain consultancy, in 2010.

“Tony’s customers felt he was the most ethical, honest and trustworthy consultant they knew. He was always the smartest guy in the room. When he started speaking, people listened. His knowledge of the industry engendered respect,” said Bob Charles, one of his partners, who lives in St. Louis.

Mr. Scaletta’s colleagues said that he worked with large drug companies to lower their prices and increase the production of generic drugs. Among his clients were drug producers, pharmacy chains and mail-order pharmacy businesses.

“Tony helped our clients improve their businesses substantially,” said Mr. Charles.

He belonged to the L’Hirondelle Club in Ruxton and was an accomplished tennis and platform tennis player who competed in regional tournaments. Friends said he studied tennis statistics and scouted his opponents carefully.

“I called him Mr. Backboard — he got everything back. He also had this infectious smile. He was a true family man and was one of those persons who was a good friend to have,” said John Molli, a neighbor and fellow tennis player. “He loved to grill and smoke foods. He also loved his cigars and his bourbon.”

Another player, Heiko Osterchrist, said, “Tony was a family man. He was great with his wife and three sons. He had a wicked, dry sense of humor. It was hysterical. It was an honor to call him my friend.”

Mr. Scaletta completed 10 marathons, including the Boston race. He also ran in the Baltimore Running Festival.

Mr. Scaletta was a Roland Park Baseball Leagues coach and volunteer for 10 years. His team was the Mustangs.

“Coach Tony ran his games for the fun of his players,” said Louise Macsherry, secretary of the baseball league for 46 years. “Each player had the opportunity to try any position he or she wanted to play. Tony had the respect from the other coaches in the league for running fair and honest games. Roland Park has benefited from his example and values Tony as a part of its history.”

A funeral Mass will be held at 10 a.m. Monday at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St., where he was a lector, Eucharistic minister and pre-Cana sponsor.

Survivors include his wife of 27 years, a drama teacher at the Cathedral School; three sons, William Scaletta and Jack Scaletta, both of Baltimore, and Luke Scaletta of Chicago; his father and stepmother, Alfred and Sandy Scaletta of Algonquin, Ill.; his mother and stepfather, Nancy and Curt Hozian of Kildeer, Ill.; a brother, Alfred Scaletta Jr. of Hawthorn Woods, Ill.; and two sisters, Teresa Scaletta of Marina del Rey, Calif. and Gina Strelecki of Wauconda, Ill.

jacques.kelly@baltsun.com

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