Bye bye Sourcefire

Sourcefire quickly went from a startup in a Carroll County living room to a major player in the hot cybersecurity field. That made the Columbia firm a tempting target and tech giant Cisco Systems bit.
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The Silicon Valley firm swallowed up Sourcefire for $2.7 billion in October, closing a deal announced in July.
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Cisco wasn't Sourcefire's first suitor &mdash; an anti-spam firm offered $206 million in 2008 for the then-struggling Sourcefire &mdash; not even a tenth of what Cisco later paid.
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Tech entrepreneur Martin Roesch started Sourcefire in 2001, building it around a free network security program he'd developed three years earlier.
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"I had ideas of how to monetize an open-source project, so I took the ball and ran with it," Roesch said in July. "And it worked. Not too many people thought it would."
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&mdash;Jamie Smith Hopkins

( Lloyd Fox, Baltimore Sun / November 13, 2012 )

Sourcefire quickly went from a startup in a Carroll County living room to a major player in the hot cybersecurity field. That made the Columbia firm a tempting target and tech giant Cisco Systems bit.

The Silicon Valley firm swallowed up Sourcefire for $2.7 billion in October, closing a deal announced in July.

Cisco wasn't Sourcefire's first suitor — an anti-spam firm offered $206 million in 2008 for the then-struggling Sourcefire — not even a tenth of what Cisco later paid.

Tech entrepreneur Martin Roesch started Sourcefire in 2001, building it around a free network security program he'd developed three years earlier.

"I had ideas of how to monetize an open-source project, so I took the ball and ran with it," Roesch said in July. "And it worked. Not too many people thought it would."

—Jamie Smith Hopkins

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