Vacant homes in Baltimore

Baltimore still struggles with pockets of vacant houses, including this row of buildings in the 500 block of Baker Street. (Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun / May 5, 2014)

A new video, "Building Resilience in Baltimore Through Immigration," showcases Baltimore's attempts to make the city a destination for immigrants, as a nonprofit media group works to inspire economic and social change in urban centers.

Next City released the 7-minute film this month to show how Baltimore is working to reverse its decades-long population loss by leaning on the immigrant community.

The video reports that the city lost 300,000 residents between 1950 and 2010, but recent population estimates show a small increase in residents.

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced at her inauguration in December 2011 that she would work to grow the city by 10,000 families within a decade.

"I am inspired by the optimism, determination, and resilience of immigrant communities living in our city and their ability to rebuild a brighter future after great adversity," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.

"Developing the necessary tools to ensure immigrants can reach their fullest potential is vital in making Baltimore a welcoming city, while promoting economic development and growing Baltimore."

Population estimates released in March 2013 showed that Baltimore grew by 1,100 residents in the previous 12 months.

Rawlings-Blake has said that she wants to make immigrants feel welcome in Baltimore. She also issued an executive order to protect immigrants from discrimination by city agencies.

For more on Next City, visit nextcity.org.