Gov,Martin O'Malley welcomes the state's participation in a nationwide  settlement that is expected to bring almost $1 billion to Maryland  victims of mortgage abuses but doesn't have much to say about the role played by Attorney General Douglas L. Gansler.

In an artfully worded statement released Thursday, O'Malley praises Commissioner of Financial Regulation Mark Kaufman, an appointeee of his who took part in  the talks. But nowhere is mentioned the attorney general, who actually signed off on the deal on Maryland's behalf.

Here is the text:

“There is no more powerful place in our State than a family’s home, and there is nothing more important for a family’s security and future than a job. Today’s announcement of a nearly $1 billion settlement with the nation’s five largest mortgage servicers is welcome news to the thousands of Marylanders who have faced or are facing the  risk of losing their home. 

 “I applaud the hard work and commitment of Maryland Commissioner of Financial Regulation Mark Kaufman - one of only two banking regulators nationwide who served on the Executive Committee – who led this nationwide effort to develop strong new standards to address the servicing practices that led to this crisis. Thanks to our federal partners at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and at theU.S. Department of Justice, we have reached this unprecedented settlement, which not only provides significant relief to Maryland homeowners, but puts an end to practices that contributed to the foreclosure crisis across the country. 

Gansler, like O'Malley, is a Democrat. But the attorney general is also considered a leading contender for the Democratic nomination for governor in 2014 against O'Malley's lieutenant governor and political partner, Anthony G. Brown.

Gansler, of course, is perfectly capable of blowing his own horn. He released a statement hailing the "landmark agreement – the largest of its kind in Maryland history." But he did manage to share some of the credit with Kaufman.