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Bill Clinton to host Anthony Brown fundraiser

Former President Bill Clinton will host a fundraiser for Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's gubernatorial bid next month, according to a fundraiser invitation that called it "a once in a lifetime event."

Clinton formally endorsed Brown earlier this month and praised him as "uniquely qualified" to be Maryland's next governor.

At the time, the campaign promised the former president, who remains popular among Democrats, would campaign for Brown in May. That campaign support comes in the form of May 13 fundraising event at a conference center in Potomac, according to the fundraiser invitation.

Tickets to next month's event will cost between $500 and $4,000 - the maximum amount a donor can give to a single Maryland candidate. 

Brown was an early supporter of Hillary Clinton's presidential bid in 2008, and remained so even after Barack Obama gained significant support throughout Maryland. Brown's campaign said that he and Bill Clinton struck up a separate relationship years earlier, at an Annapolis bill signing in 2000 when the state passed a new gun-control law.  

The marquee fundraising event comes as the acrimonious fight for the Democratic nomination has increasingly been fought on television in Baltimore and the costly Washington, D.C. market.

Brown's furious fundraising last year erased the cash advantage held by his top rival, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler. Both candidates have millions to spend and less than nine weeks until the June 24 primary. 

Del. Heather Mizeur, who accepted public financing and has run a more grassroots campaign, is also on the Democratic ballot.

The Clinton fundraising event comes weeks after a Supreme Court ruling overturned limits on how much a donor can give out during an electoral cycle. In the wake of that ruling, Maryland's Board of Elections said they would not enforce the state's $10,000 cap for donors.

Even though candidates cannot accept more than $4,000 from a single donor, the ruling meant that donors who had already spread around $10,000 in Maryland elections this cycle are now free to give more.  

Copyright © 2014, The Baltimore Sun
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