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Maryland's marquee race in 2012, the 6th District is drawing national attention after its boundaries were redrawn to make it more attractive for Democrats. The incumbent is Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, a Frederick County Republican.


Roscoe G. Bartlett, Republican (incumbent)

  • Party: Republican
  • Age: 86
  • City of residence Buckeystown
  • Occupation: Public servant, small businessman, farmer
  • Family: Married, 10 children, 18 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren
  • Campaign website: www.Bartlettforcongress
    .org
  • Public campaign contact: info@Bartlettforcongress
    .org
    , 301-732-5664
  • Experience: Scientist, inventor, professor, small business owner and farmer.
  • Education: B.S., Columbia Union College, 1947; M.S., University of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1952
  • Have you ever been convicted of a crime (not including minor traffic violations)? No.
As you know, the Bush-era income tax cuts will expire at the end of this year. Do you support extending the cuts for all income levels, only on individual income under $200,000 (under $250,000 for families), or not at all? If you support an extension of some kind, should it be paid for?

I do not support a massive tax increase next year on American individuals, families and businesses. With Americans' unemployment rate over 8 percent for more than 40 months, it's important to extend these lower rates for every American who pays income taxes.


Is there any circumstance in which you would support extending a pay freeze on federal employees and/or requiring current federal employees to contribute more to their retirement plans? Please explain.

Earlier this year I voted against both a pay freeze as well as a pension cut for federal workers because I oppose singling out government employees in the process of making needed spending cuts.


The Congressional Budget Office projects spending on Medicare, Medicaid and other government health programs will more than double as a share of the nation's economy by 2037. What specific changes would you propose to reduce Medicare costs?

The mathematics of Medicare doom the program to bankruptcy for many current beneficiaries, those near retirement as well as younger workers unless it is reformed. Higher costs, reduced access to health care and a $500 billion cut to Medicare are among the reasons why I opposed Obamacare. I support providing current beneficiaries and younger workers with more choices and competition and greater oversight to reduce fraud as key reforms to preserve these vital health care programs for our seniors, those in need and younger generations.


Would you support increased federal spending on highways and other infrastructure as a way to boost the construction industry? If so, how would you pay for it?

I voted for the new law that provides funding to pay for federal highway and transportation projects to maintain and modernize this critical infrastructure. This new law reduces red tape to speed construction and completion of transportation projects and provides states with greater flexibility to meet Maryland residents' needs. I commute to and from Washington, D.C., and understand that investments in the I-270 corridor and other roads improves workers' and businesses' productivity, reduces time wasted and pollution from traffic congestion and enhances our quality of life.


Would you support U.S. military involvement in Iran if there were evidence that it was close to developing a nuclear weapon?

I support utilizing all elements of America's national power to prevent Iran from developing a nuclear weapon. I have voted for and strongly support tough new sanctions that limit sales of Iranian oil to deny the Iranian regime the resources to develop or acquire nuclear weapons capability and to compel it to cooperate with independent, international inspections.


Describe a specific policy you would pursue in Congress that would have support from members of the opposite party.

As one of the only scientists and inventors in the Congress and a co-chairman of the House Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucus, I am well respected for my record of working with colleagues across the aisle for enacting policies to promote the development of domestic, renewable energy sources. I authored the successful House bill the president signed to extend many renewable energy tax credits for five years until 2016.





John Delaney, Democrat

  • Party: Democrat
  • Age: 49
  • City of residence Potomac
  • Occupation: Businessman
  • Family: Married, four daughters
  • Campaign website: www.delaney2012.com
  • Public campaign contact: 301-215-6363
  • Experience: Founded two NYSE listed Maryland companies, including CapitalSource, which provides loans to small and mid-sized businesses across the United States and employs around 600 people. Also, founded HealthCare Financial Partners, a former NYSE company, and BancAlliance, a cooperative of community banks across the United States.
  • Education: B.A., Columbia University, 1985; J.D., Georgetown University Law Center, 1988.
  • Have you ever been convicted of a crime (not including minor traffic violations)? No.
As you know, the Bush-era income tax cuts will expire at the end of this year. Do you support extending the cuts for all income levels, only on individual income under $200,000 (under $250,000 for families), or not at all? If you support an extension of some kind, should it be paid for?

I support ending the Bush tax cuts for those making over $250,000, modestly raising most capital gains taxes, and lowering corporate income taxes while abolishing certain corporate loopholes to produce a net gain in corporate tax revenues. I also support making our tax system easier to follow and eliminating deductions in general. Raising tax revenues, however, should be done as part of a grand, long-term deficit reduction plan similar to Simpson-Bowles, which I think is an excellent framework. Included in this should be targeted investments designed to make our country more competitive.


Is there any circumstance in which you would support extending a pay freeze on federal employees and/or requiring current federal employees to contribute more to their retirement plans? Please explain.

I strongly believe everyone will have to make sacrifices to put us on the path of fiscal responsibility. The notion of shared sacrifice for the common good is a central and defining feature of our character as Americans. One of the consequences of not dealing with the big issues that drive our fiscal situation — taxes, entitlements, and defense — is that discretionary spending gets unfairly squeezed. I believe that too often federal employees present a politically expedient target that doesn't actually end up making much of a fiscal impact and it is therefore unfair. Federal employees have already had a multi-year pay freeze and benefits have been reduced for new employees.


The Congressional Budget Office projects spending on Medicare, Medicaid and other government health programs will more than double as a share of the nation's economy by 2037. What specific changes would you propose to reduce Medicare costs?

I am supportive of Simpson-Bowles as a framework to begin to get our fiscal house in order, but at the same time I think the plan doesn't focus enough on the nuts and bolts of how to reduce future healthcare costs.

While I applaud the broad aspects of the Affordable Care Act as it relates to providing health care for all Americans, I think more needs to be done to reduce healthcare costs. As a country we spend twice as much on healthcare as compared to many highly developed nations and our outcomes are not much better. This is a significant problem, it indicates that our healthcare system is broken, and it affects the long term fiscal strength and competiveness of our country.

As long as healthcare costs continue to outpace GDP growth we will have serious problems paying for care and it will affect overall U.S. competiveness. While there are numerous ideas that have been considered to reduce healthcare costs, and many will work and many will not, the main issue is that Congress needs to show determination and begin to solve the cost problem in healthcare. Our current posture — doing nothing — will only make the problem more significant. Put another way, as a country we should try to be approximately right as it relates to fixing healthcare as opposed being precisely wrong. By doing something to lower costs we will be making progress, by doing nothing we are being precisely wrong. Our system has problems, and there are sensible steps we can and should take, including allowing Medicare to negotiate with the drug companies and further implementing technology to streamline record-keeping and costs.


Would you support increased federal spending on highways and other infrastructure as a way to boost the construction industry? If so, how would you pay for it?

Yes. Investing in infrastructure will create both short and long term economic growth. Put another way, it stimulates the economy in the short term and it "pencils out" in the long term by making our country more competitive. For our country to grow — which is the most important thing for us to focus on as an economy — our government needs to be investing in all form of infrastructure — transportation, communication and energy.

Infrastructure is one area where you very clearly need government to play a role and in the past this has been a bipartisan issue. Infrastructure is an area that the private sector wants to invest in, because it has historically been a very good investment. An infrastructure bank would facilitate public-private partnerships to rebuild our infrastructure. In particular it would combine the role of government in designing and implementing our infrastructure needs with the significant private capital currently available in our economy.


Would you support U.S. military involvement in Iran if there were evidence that it was close to developing a nuclear weapon?

I believe that the economic sanctions against Iran have been working, and should be given time. I agree with the president's overall position that all options should be on the table to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. The consequences are relevant to the whole world.


Describe a specific policy you would pursue in Congress that would have support from members of the opposite party.

I'm a strong advocate for long-term deficit reduction combined with investments designed to make the United States' economy grow faster and be more competitive. It is critical that we make our country more competitive so that we can reverse the income stagnation trends that we have seen across the last two decades. This is an area that has wide support, not only in both parties, but among the American people as a whole.

There are good, bipartisan proposals out there that take a balanced approach to reducing our debt. The Simpson-Bowles proposal in particular was a positive first step. In fact, I believe if put to a vote of the American people, Simpson-Bowles would be overwhelmingly supported.

I'm also supportive of comprehensive redistricting reform and term limits.