News Maryland Sun Investigates

Sun Investigates: The Dark Side of Seafood

The seafood black market is a hidden, but lucrative world. Wild-caught illegal imports are worth $1.3 to $2.1 billion annually across the United States, the world's second-largest importer of seafood. Fraudulent mislabeling of species – like foreign crab as more expensive Maryland crab— is a common occurrence. The Baltimore Sun investigates the enforcement of such crimes and impact to local seafood industries and communities.

  • Seafood fraud cases plummet as NOAA cuts investigators

    Seafood fraud cases plummet as NOAA cuts investigators

    In a sprawling warehouse five miles inland from the port of Newark, N.J., Special Agent Scott Doyle was dwarfed by the metal shipping container that had just arrived from Indonesia and was headed to Maryland. It held 14 tons of pasteurized crabmeat, packed into 28,008 one-pound cans. To Doyle,...

  • U.S. enforcement changes raise concern over seafood fraud

    U.S. enforcement changes raise concern over seafood fraud

    With seafood fraud a continuing problem in Maryland and across the nation, environmentalists, fishermen and lawmakers are expressing concern about a decline in the number of special investigative agents and enforcement cases at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Changes at the...

  • Crabmeat imports flood into Baltimore's port

    Crabmeat imports flood into Baltimore's port

    Two million pounds of crab product from China traveled up the Chesapeake Bay into the port of Baltimore during the first 10 months of 2014. Another million pounds came from Indonesia. In total, more than 4 million pounds of crab from all over the world moved into the port, according to an analysis...

  • New U.S. plan aims to stop seafood fraud and black market

    New U.S. plan aims to stop seafood fraud and black market

    Addressing growing concerns over seafood fraud, a presidential task force called Tuesday for expanded enforcement and a new program giving consumers more information about the origins of the imported fish, crab and other seafood they eat. The new program would trace seafood from its harvest to...

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