News Maryland Sun Investigates

Intractable problems

As part of its continuing coverage of Freddie Gray’s death, The Baltimore Sun is examining some of the intractable problems that affected his life — and still trouble thousands of city residents. This series of occasional articles has focused on lead poisoning, segregation in public housing and other topics.

  • Housing policies still pin poor in Baltimore, but some escape to suburbs

    Housing policies still pin poor in Baltimore, but some escape to suburbs

    Danielle Hill has a secret, one she shares with dozens of other residents of Baltimore public housing. It goes like this: They don't live in the city. Instead, they live in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties, in houses purchased by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City. Thousands...

  • Lead paint: Despite progress, hundreds of Maryland children still poisoned

    Lead paint: Despite progress, hundreds of Maryland children still poisoned

    There's a huge hole in the kitchen ceiling of the rowhouse Olivia Griffin rents in West Baltimore. Rain leaks in through the roof, the lights in a bedroom don't work, and standing water fills one end of the basement. The 27-year-old mother's biggest worry, though, is the flaking, peeling paint...

  • Heroin creates crowded illicit economy in Baltimore

    Heroin creates crowded illicit economy in Baltimore

    For Anthony Miles, Feb. 15, 2013, was a busy day of juggling calls, setting up meetings and touting a high-quality shipment he was expecting soon. Still, he found time to put air in the tires of his Mercedes and to note how well the day was going. Raising a large stack of bills in both hands, he...

  • Criticism leveled at schools for Maryland juvenile offenders

    Criticism leveled at schools for Maryland juvenile offenders

    When state officials decided in 2004 to turn the education programs in juvenile justice facilities over to the Maryland State Department of Education, the plan was praised as a bold move to help rehabilitate some of the state's most vulnerable youths. Finally, they thought, these classrooms would...

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