News Maryland Sun Investigates
Sun series:

Collateral Damage

For more than a year, Baltimore Sun reporter Andrea K. McDaniels and photographer Lloyd Fox have examined the unseen impact of violence — on children, caregivers and victims’ relatives — in the Baltimore area. McDaniels wrote the articles while participating in The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Journalism.

The series sparked the creation of a neighborhood youth violence prevention plan that has received a $75,000 grant. It also has received numerous awards, including first place for public health reporting from the Association of Health Care Journalists, an honorable mention from Columbia University’s Dart Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma, and a James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism from Hunter College.

PART ONE: Advocates aim to save Baltimore children from impact of violence

PART TWO: Families struggle to care for victims of violence

PART THREE: Relatives of Baltimore murder victims struggle with grief

 

  • Groups win $75,000 grant after series in The Sun

    Groups win $75,000 grant after series in The Sun

    A coalition of community groups in the Upton/Druid Heights neighborhood has won a $75,000 grant to develop a youth violence prevention plan for the neighborhood after being featured in a Baltimore Sun series on the hidden impacts of Baltimore's crime problem. The three-day series, Collateral Damage,...

  • Survey shows prevalence of violence in lives of Baltimore students

    Survey shows prevalence of violence in lives of Baltimore students

    When the familiar pop-pop sound rang out late Friday afternoon, Tyrese Carter and his friend Destiny McIntosh were watching television in his family's apartment. As gunshots are so common in their neighborhood, they joked that that was probably the sound they heard. Tyrese calmly sauntered to the...

  • Moving families to combat aftermath of violence

    Moving families to combat aftermath of violence

    Surveys conducted by the ACLU of Maryland are finding that one way to offset the hidden health consequences of violence is to move families out of troubled neighborhoods. A three-part series this month in The Baltimore Sun chronicled how community groups and social workers are helping kids learn...

  • More must be done to address aftermath of city violence, advocates say

    More must be done to address aftermath of city violence, advocates say

    More needs to be done to address a hidden toll of violence that is creating a ripple of social ills in Baltimore, including hurting children's ability to learn, community advocates and health professionals say. The Rev. Frank M. Reid III of Bethel AME Church in Upton/Druid Heights said his church...

  • Relatives of Baltimore homicide victims struggle to get over loss

    Relatives of Baltimore homicide victims struggle to get over loss

    Every part of their lives is affected. Some can't hold jobs, and families break apart. Grieving parents may not realize their own children are also suffering. They often develop mental and physical health problems, including eating disorders, insomnia, depression and paranoia. They get pain in...

  • Relatives of Baltimore murder victims struggle with grief

    Relatives of Baltimore murder victims struggle with grief

    When Alice Oaks' older son was shot to death in Baltimore in 2008, she said her goodbye at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center. He lay there, a tube still in his mouth, and it seemed to her that his body was glowing. She felt numb. She bent over and kissed him softly on the forehead and the cheek....

  • Families struggle to care for victims of violence

    Families struggle to care for victims of violence

    His mother remembers the way he used to be: a daredevil with an athletic build who drove a red Pontiac Firebird, listened to hard rock bands like Metallica and did handstands on his thumbs. But when a neighbor waving a gun shot Charles "Chuck" Ropka in the head, the Parkville 18-year-old was left...

  • Part One: Advocates aim to save Baltimore children from impact of violence

    Advocates aim to save Baltimore children from impact of violence

    The first time she witnessed a student's major tantrum — a 2-year-old hurling a toy stove filled with plastic pots and pans — Shanikia Johnson had just started as a teacher at Little Flowers Child Development Center in West Baltimore. She knew toddlers acted out. But the rage-filled reaction, triggered...

  • Comparing the 'health' of Baltimore neighborhoods

    Comparing the 'health' of Baltimore neighborhoods

    A Baltimore City Health Department report ranks city neighborhoods for many social determinants and health outcomes. West Baltimore neighborhood Upton/Druid Heights ranks near bottom in many factors while North Baltimore's Roland Park ranks near the top. Explore the rankings for city neighborhoods...

  • Video: Learning to help the children

    Learning to help the children

    Teachers at Little Flowers in Upton/Druid Heights struggled with the behavior of some children until realizing it might be a result of the violence in the neighborhood. Trauma training has made the difference. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun video)

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