A proposal to use preserved agricultural land for mulching and composting  at first glance appears not unreasonable. Until you hear the details. These details include large, loud diesel trucks  coming down rural residential roads every few minutes from dawn until dusk, dumping loads of debris with the noise from their clanging metal gates echoing through the countryside.

These details also include the continual operation of large, loud diesel equipment on site to process these dumped loads. In addition, the stress on the rural residential roads will result in their rapid deterioration, a result only someone in the road repair business would like.

This is a scenario that could only the embraced by the applicant and those either directly benefiting from the proposal or hoping to profit from the precedent.

If the only requirement to use preserved agricultural land is that a plant product is involved, what comes next? A wood pulp processing plant? Hopefully, the Department of Planning and Zoning will not take an expansive view towards this proposed intensive use, and instead direct the applicant  toward an appropriate industrial site with access to heavy duty roads.

A good neighbor would not propose this in a rural residential zone.

Steve Curtis

Dayton